Book chronicles family’s roots from Mexico to Gary

“We had a very small wedding but solemn at church,” the new bride wrote in English, her second language.

An orchestra played at the church early that morning, and again at the couple’s wedding reception in San Francisco del Rincon, the municipal seat in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The groom requested the song, “Siempre te amare,” or “I’ll always love you.”

The young Francesca had no idea how important her writings would become to her family decades later and into the 21st century.

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Federal judge prohibits ICE detainers in Marion County

A federal judge has approved of a settlement between the ACLU of Indiana and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office to end Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold requests on people accused of living in the country illegally unless there is a warrant.

The action comes despite the U.S. Justice Department’s intervention in the case and requests that the Sheriff’s Office comply with the ICE seizure requests.

In a 36-page order handed down Tuesday evening, U.S. District Judge Sarah Evans Barker issued an injunction that prevents the Sheriff’s Office from detaining any person based solely on detention requests from ICE unless there is a warrant or probable cause.

An ICE detainer is a request of local police to hold people in jail beyond the time when they otherwise should be released, generally a 48-hour period. ICE is seeking more time to check their citizenship status and, if needed, get a deportation warrant, even if the initial arrest is for something minor, say a traffic infraction.

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1 In 3 Latinos Report Discrimination

About a third of Latinos in America say they’ve been personally discriminated against when it comes to applying for jobs, being paid equally or considered for promotions — and when trying to rent a room or apartment or buy a house. Slightly more (37 percent) say they’ve personally experienced racial or ethnic slurs because of their race or ethnicity.

These are some of the key findings NPR is releasing Wednesday from a poll done with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The survey of 3,453 adults looked at a wide range of issues in many groups and included 803 adults identifying as Latino or Hispanic. The poll also surveyed African-Americans, white Americans, Native Americans, Asian-Americans and LGBTQ adults. We are releasing data by each of these groups on a weekly basis.

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Facing Discrimination In Public Life, Latinos Stay Positive About Government

Latinos say institutional discrimination, including discrimination while trying to vote or participate in politics, is a problem in America today. However, when asked, many Latinos reported feeling better about their local government.

That’s according to a new survey out this week from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The survey found that 15 percent of Latinos say they’ve been discriminated against personally when trying to vote or participate in politics because they are Latino. Separately, 1 in 10 says that where he or she lives, other Latinos are “often” discriminated against in voting or politics.

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No documentation? No problem

Dominguez noted that the credit union does not concern itself with the documentation status of the immigrants it is trying to serve. “Our role is to provide education and banking services to people that present the necessary documentation to open accounts with us,” he said, citing such identification vehicles as Individual Taxpayer Identification numbers, Social Security numbers, the Matricula Consular cards (an ID card issued by the Mexican government), passports and electoral IDs, among others.

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Indiana Minority Children More Likely To Face Obstacles

Children in Indiana’s minority and immigrant populations often have a more difficult start in life according to the conclusions of the latest look at disparity in wellbeing for Hoosier kids.

About 20 percent of Indiana’s population identifies as African-American, Hispanic, Asian or another non-white race.

Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman says a new report from the Annie E. Casey foundation finds children in these households are less likely to benefit from opportunities to grow and develop.

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BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

DE PUEBLO A PUEBLO: A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH, 2017
BUSKIRK-CHUMLEY THEATRE
7:00 p.m.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo: A Benefit Concert for Puerto Rico, Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands’ serves as the kickoff event to raise funds for communities in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean recently impacted by devastating natural disasters. The event will showcase a diverse collection of Latin American and Caribbean music, performed by artists who have made Southern Indiana their home, including performances by cellist Emilio Colón, Mariachi Perla del Medio Oeste, Orquesta Escuela Vieja, Soneros la Caliza and other special guests. It will also feature a series of short presentations by Bloomington community members who have recently visited the affected areas.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo ~ From People to People,’ is a volunteer-based initiative of concerned citizens from Bloomington, Indiana, many of whom have personal and/or professional roots in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean. This effort counts with the support of the City of Bloomington, local community leaders and organizations, Indiana University faculty, students and staff, as well as the collaboration of the Centro Comunal Latino, the Center for Sustainable Living and the Narra Foundation.

Want to help? Please consider making a donation. Thank you!

A map’s worth of Hispanic heritage

On the third floor of the Student Union—on any given day or time—Latinx students can be found, some speaking in English and others in their native language. They swap stories of the day, share their passions, wishes and support one another. Over the past month, the Office of Latino Programs and Services has celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15); here are their stories.

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Bloomington celebrates the end of Hispanic Heritage Month

“We host this event every year to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and celebrate the independence of many nations,” Overman said. “We try to change it a little each year, but keep the things people love, like music.”

Overman said this event is to both celebrate and educate. Monroe County Public Library offers bilingual storytelling and has many Spanish media selections available, and this event helps spread awareness of these resources and gets the community involved.

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Latino community remembers heritage

The event marked the annual celebration of “Nuestras Raices,” translating to “Our Roots,” an event set up by the Latino Graduate Student Association. About 15 group members ranging from freshmen to graduate students to staff members gathered to share stories of their families in the Latino community.

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Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Caribbean relief efforts

Dear community:

As all of you are aware, neighbors in our hemisphere have suffered tremendous loss in recent weeks. Mexico’s earthquakes hit very hard the southern states, Mexico City and Morelia. In addition, two hurricanes, Irma and María, devastated many Caribbean nations, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. As members of the Indiana University community, we are reaching out to our colleagues, students, staff, and friends in an effort to provide support to our many sister communities, where many of us who are part of IU have our roots as well as many family members and friends.

Hoping to contribute to the relief efforts, we have identified organizations that are assisting communities affected by these catastrophic events. Most of these organizations have been vetted by independent agencies and have an established track record of working with local communities in need. Following is a list of organizations/agencies that are providing relief to Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean. The websites provide information about the mission of these organizations and instructions about how to make donations online.

Mexico Earthquake Relief:
International Community Foundation:
https://donate.icfdn.org/npo/international-disaster-relief-fund

National Museum of Mexican Art Chicago for Mexico and Puerto Rico Relief Fund:
http://nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org/relief

Hispanic Federation:
https://hispanicfederation.org/donate

Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief:
Hurricane María Community Recovery Fund: https://connect.clickandpledge.com/w/Form/cb4a3c78-5694-4324-bead-42c8ad94c1bf

Episcopal Relief Fund:
http://www.episcopalrelief.org/

Fundación Comunitaria de Puerto Rico:
https://www.fcpr.org

U.S. Virgin Islands and the Caribbean:
All Hands:
https://www.hands.org/projects/hurricane-irma-maria-response/

Unicef:
https://www.unicefusa.org

Your contribution is greatly appreciated. These communities will survive and thrive, but need our support.

Thank you. Gracias.

In solidarity/En solidaridad,

Raquel Anderson – Professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Arlene J. Díaz – Associate Professor, Department of History
Luis A. González – Associate Librarian, IU Libraries
Juan Manuel Soto-Arriví – Senior Lecturer, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

9,840 DACA Recipients In Indiana Impacted By Trump’s Decision

9,840 Hoosiers receive benefits from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, according to the most recent data from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

As NPR reports, President Donald Trump announced Tuesday he is ending thee program in the next six months, giving Congress a chance to codify the program’s legal protections into law.

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Federal judge criticized by Trump returning home to Indiana for special celebration

Judge Gonzalo Curiel, the California federal jurist attacked by then presidential candidate Donald Trump, will be returning to his home state of Indiana to help commemorate the Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.

The federal court will host the event at 2 p.m. Oct. 6 in the Sarah Evans Barker Courtroom at the Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse in Indianapolis. Jointly sponsored by the Southern District and the Indiana State Bar Association Latino Affairs Committee, the program is free and open to the public. Attorneys will be eligible for continuing legal education credit but pre-registration is required. Visit http://www.inbar.org/event/2017Curiel  for more information.

Curiel gained national fame when Trump in 2016 questioned his abilities as a jurist and loyalties as an American. The attack came after the judge allowed lawsuits filed by former students against Trump University to proceed. On the campaign trail, Trump wrongly described Curiel as a Mexican and insinuated the judge was issuing biased rulings because Trump was taking a strong stance against immigration.

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IUPUI Celebrates Largest Freshman Class

INDIANAPOLIS –

IUPUI has set a new record for its largest freshman class and says this year’s group is also the most diverse in its history. The university says more than 4,100 beginning freshman have enrolled for the 2017-2018 academic year, beating the previous record, set in 2014.

This year’s class also represents a 2.8 percent increase over last year. The university says minority students represent 28.3 percent of the freshman class with Hispanic/Latino students making up the largest minority group at 9.8 percent.

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Republicans hire mariachi band to welcome Dem senator

The Senate Republican campaign arm surprised Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly (Ind.) with a mariachi band at one of his recent campaign stops.

Republicans have taken to calling Donnelly “Mexico Joe” over a report last month that his family’s arts and crafts company, Stewart Superior Corp., manufactures some of its products in Mexico. Donnelly announced shortly after the report that he was selling his stock in the company.

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Places with the fewest immigrants push back hardest against immigration

The paradox of this emotional debate is that generally the states and communities with the fewest immigrants are pushing to reduce immigration over the objections of the places with the most immigrants.
Even as Republicans from President Trump to leading legislators in the House and Senate are driving to reduce both undocumented and legal immigration, the core of the GOP’s electoral strength in both presidential and Congressional contests are the places with the smallest share of immigrants, US Census data show.

Do Undocumented Immigrants Pay Taxes?

“Do you think an illegal immigrant getting money is going to be paying taxes? Sure, some probably do only because employers are insisting on it. But there’s very little percentage wise very little, probably 5 percent, 10 percent. It’s a very small amount pay taxes … Look, they’re here illegally. They’re not paying taxes.”

On the surface, the claim seems plausible. This is a population that largely lives in the shadows. And it’s fair to assume that many undocumented workers are paid under the table, with little incentive to report their earnings.

But while this may be the case for some, it certainly does not hold true for the majority.

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Agency having money issues: Fundraisers not getting attention from residents

“We don’t have any federal or state funding, and we are not part of United Way,” she said. “What we need right now is the funds to keep our operations and doors open for three days a week. That would be good for us to be able to keep serving our clients.”

About 80 families visit the agency a month asking for help with translating birth certificates, identification cards and other written documents or correspondence. The agency also helps write résumés and letters of permission for children to travel and assistance with applications for services offered within the community.

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NAACP sues over Lake County precinct consolidation law

The Gary NAACP wants a federal judge to block a new law that would consolidate Lake County’s voting precincts.

The organization claims the law, formerly known as SB 220, would discriminate against the black and Latino populations in Lake County by making voting access more inconvenient.

Defendants are Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson and individual members of the Indiana Election Division.

Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office declined to comment on the lawsuit.

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Walmart’s C.E.O. Had Plenty to Say About Trump. So Did His Customers (in Bloomington, IN).

Since the violence in Charlottesville, chief executives across corporate America have had to weigh the risks of taking a stand against the administration. Mr. McMillon himself, while harshly rebuking the president, initially opted not to step down from the Strategic and Policy Forum before it disbanded — an example of the delicate balance that corporate leaders try to strike when dealing with Mr. Trump.

On Wednesday, we spoke with customers at Walmart stores in three communities — Las Vegas; Bloomington, Ind.; and Union Township, N.J.

This is what they had to say about Walmart chief executive’s decision to weigh into the political fray this week.

Why are people still racist?

“The only way to change bias is to change culture,” Richeson said. “You have to change what is acceptable in society. People today complain about politically correct culture, but what that does is provide a check on people’s outward attitude, which in turn influences how we think about ourselves internally. Everything we’re exposed to gives us messages about who is good and bad.”

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Indianapolis looks to end compliance with immigration detainer requests

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office plans to drastically reduce its compliance with federal immigration detainer requests.

On Monday, attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and the city of Indianapolis filed a stipulated judgment (or settlement) and injunction to end the practice of holding people in jail without probable cause on behalf of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The agreement is expected to be signed by U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Barker.

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At Least 18 Lynchings Took Place In Indiana By 1940

A national nonprofit organization says at least 18 lynchings took place in Indiana between 1880 and 1940, as part of more than 300 lynchings in eight states outside the deep south during that time.

The Equal Justice Initiative released a new report Tuesday outlining the history of racial terror lynchings in the United States.

“Racial terror lynchings were horrific acts of targeted violence against African Americans…by white mobs who murdered black people with no risk of accountability or punishment,” the report says.

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