Reducing Immigration Harms America’s Economy 

Donald Trump’s immigration policies were harmful to America’s long-term economic future. That becomes clearer as one compares the Trump administration’s actions to the projected increase in the number of immigrants under recently introduced immigration legislation. The U.S. Citizenship Act, developed by the Biden administration, would aid long-term economic growth by increasing the number of legal immigrants by 28%. In contrast, Trump administration policies would have cut legal immigration in half. The immigration policy path America chooses in the long-term will make a significant impact on economic growth and future labor force growth, of which immigrants are a vital part.

Read Forbes article here

and Insider article ”immigration would help curb both inflation and the labor shortage”

About 6 million U.S. adults identify as Afro-Latino

Afro-Latino identity is a distinct one, with deep roots in colonial Latin America. As a result, it can often exist alongside a person’s Hispanic, racial or national origin identities. The life experiences of Afro-Latinos are shaped by race, skin tone and other factors, in ways that differ from other Hispanics. And though most Afro-Latinos identify as Hispanic or Latino, not all do so, according to new Pew Research Center estimates based on a survey of U.S. adults conducted from November 2019 to June 2020.

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Immigrants Detained In Indiana Jail Sue County And Federal Governments For Illegally Relying On ICE Contract

Four people detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) at the Clay County Jail in Indiana filed a federal lawsuit today exposing how the county’s government has illegally used revenue from its ICE contract to award raises to county employees and pay for operations and capital improvements at unrelated county facilities, while leaving immigrants to suffer in the jail’s inhumane conditions. The lawsuit also details how the federal government’s immigration inspections system has turned a blind eye to unsanitary conditions and human suffering inside the jail.

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Indiana must do more to put more Hoosiers of color and women onto and successfully through its tech education pathways

Talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is not!

Finding and retaining talent is job No. 1 for the Indiana tech workforce, but the traditional education path is working for only a small %age of Indiana students and employers. Indiana must resolve its issues of access, opportunity and equity if it is to develop the tech workforce that companies must have in the coming years.

Modernizing our educational pathways will be difficult, and it won’t be helped by additional factors discussed earlier on TechPoint Index like the pandemic-induced Great Resignation, the wave of Baby Boomer retirements, and a poorly timed college enrollment cliff that alone were creating a perfect storm of tech talent supply and demand challenges. Our recent research with Fourth Economy and credible economic indicators, clearly show us an Indiana tech talent imperative: We must inclusively grow and develop the state’s tech workforce to 230,0000 workers by 2030.

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Ruben Marté running for Sheriff

COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY, DEDICATED TO PROGRESS.

Ruben Marté is a 31-year veteran with the Indiana State Police and currently serves as a Captain in the Office of the Superintendent. His previous assignments include the Legal Office, the South Zone Area Captain for the Criminal Investigation Division, Records Division Assistant Commander, Lieutenant of the Criminal Intelligence Section and Special Investigation Section, which encompasses Vehicle Theft Unit, White Collar Crime Unit, Cybercrime Unit and Crimes Against Children. Captain Marté also developed and commanded the Indiana State Police Security Threat Group Unit, which monitors and controls gang activity occurring at special events in Indiana.  This past year, Captain Marté, who is bilingual in both English and Spanish, was appointed as the first Equity and Inclusion Officer of the Indiana State Police.

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Project Stepping Stone of Indiana aims to boost Latino college enrollment


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Getting Latinos in Indiana into college — that’s what one group aims to do with the help of a special one-week summer program.

According to the 2021 Indiana College Equity report, only 49 percent of Hispanic high school graduates go to college compared to 61 percent of white students. Project Stepping Stone of Indiana (PSS) wants to change that.

Project Stepping Stone of Indiana is a program of the Escala Foundation that helps Indiana’s Latino students prepare for college and beyond.

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Study: Historic federal housing discrimination led to millions of Black, Latino Americans breathing dirtier air today


INDIANA ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTER:

The historic practice of federal housing discrimination, known as redlining, has led to millions more Black and Latino Americans breathing in dirtier air than White Americans over decades, according to a new study.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, found that redlining and other discriminatory policies have led to racially segregated communities that disproportionately exposed and continue to expose more Black and Latino Americans to nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate matter from vehicles and nearby industrial sources.

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Alzheimer’s disease is the only illness where the person passes away twice

Latino caregivers say they’re facing more barriers

Sarah Rodriguez spends most of her day multitasking as she switches from watching her mother on remote cameras to talking on video and phone calls with doctors and aides to organize proper care for the 67-year-old. The 40-year-old’s life in Virginia has been like this ever since her mom was diagnosed with younger onset Alzheimer’s two years ago.

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Indiana Hospitals Plan to Begin Tracking Health Inequities

Local data shows that doctors do a better job at ordering key tests for controlling patients’ diabetes for their white patients than their Black counterparts. For white patients, doctors order such tests on average 62% of the time. For Black patients that measure fell to 58%. It was even lower for Latino patients, 56%.

On a national scale, diabetes impacts one in six Black people and one in 10 white people. About 24% of Black people and 29% of Hispanic/Latino people who have diabetes have uncontrolled diabetes, compared with 11% of white diabetes patients.

In Marion County, where Black people make up 20% of the population, 37% of those who receive diabetes care are Black patients, said Dr. Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, vice president and chief health equity officer at IU Health.

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