Does Immigration Hurt or Help Social Security?

Another factor that often gets a finger pointed at it by critics is immigration — more specifically, undocumented workers. Peruse social media and, among the fictitious claims that the government raided Social Security, you’re bound to find comments claiming that Social Security is being hurt by legal and illegal immigration into the United States.

But is this the case? Let’s have a closer look.

Undocumented workers, by law, can’t qualify for a Social Security number and therefore are ineligible for a retired worker benefit, as well as disability and survivor’s insurance protection. Unless migrants are on a legal path to citizenship and earning lifetime work credits, they won’t qualify for a benefit from either the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust or the Disability Insurance Trust.

However, this doesn’t mean undocumented workers aren’t contributing in some way to the Social Security program. According to AARP, approximately $12 billion in payroll tax revenue (from either the workers or their employers) was collected in 2010 from undocumented migrants.

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Video On Public Charge

Posted by Popp & Bullman, Attorneys-at-Law on Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Christie Popp
Popp & Bullman
Attorneys-at-Law
205 N. College Ave. Ste 615
Bloomington, Indiana 47404
(812) 323-3339
www.poppbullman.com

National Guardsman in Racist Wrigley Brawl

Ahmad Damra, a member of the Indiana National Guard, has been identified as the man who yelled “beaners” and “spics” at Hispanic people during a brawl in the bleachers of Wrigley Field. The brawl broke out following the Chicago Cubs 5-1 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 23. The game was promoted as “Hispanic Heritage Night” with the crowd being given t-shirts that read, “Los Cubs.” As security guards separating the brawling fans, a woman can be heard telling an official that the guards “will never know what it’s like.” The Chicago Tribune reports that local police were called to investigate the incident but no charges were filed.

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Immigration influx to Indiana

The candidates and their campaign advisers undoubtedly are stoking the anti-immigration fires because it’s proven effective in past practice or in polling. But if they want Indiana to grow and prosper, they should back off the fear-mongering. A new report from the Indiana Business Research Center suggests Indiana’s workforce will grow by only 34,000 between 2020 and 2050. The state’s economic future depends on its ability to attract young workers, including legal immigrants.

Matt Kinghorn, senior demographic analyst for the research center, notes the state’s labor force will record a “relatively healthy gain of 120,000 workers between 2010 and 2020” but will likely contract over the next decade as more baby boomers retire. Lower fertility rates affect the labor pool, as well. If rates had held steady to those recorded before the Great Recession, Indiana would see 70,000 more births than are expected in that decade-long span.

Migration is another factor, of course. Indiana saw its population and labor force declining through the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, but the trend was reversed with gains in net migration between 1990 and 2010. Hispanic residents moving into the state were responsible for 77 percent of the gain, according to data from the Applied Population Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin.

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Seventh Annual Indiana Latino Expo

As part of its efforts to build meaningful bridges with Latino communities, Indiana University will sponsor and host an exhibition booth at the 2018 Indiana Latino Expo. Held on Oct. 13 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, the Indiana Latino Expo will offer families and prospective students the opportunity to learn valuable information about the many educational opportunities available through IU.

The expo will take place in the Element Financial-Blue Ribbon Pavilion at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, and is free and open to all.

More information about IU’s presence at the 2018 Indiana Latino Expo, including details about the 21st Century Scholars Program, can be found at diversity.iu.edu.

Hoosiers need to know about the battle over immigration

The Trump administration has covered a lot of ground when it comes to immigration, often battling federal courts over actions taken to crack down on undocumented immigrants, restrict travel to and from predominantly Muslim countries and fighting in Congress for funding for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

A week into his presidency, Donald Trump announced a 90-day travel ban aimed at seven majority-Muslim countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — and a 120-day ban on refugees worldwide. That action was struck down by federal district and appeals courts. A second version of the ban was also struck down. In August, the Supreme Court upheld a third version of the ban that excluded Sudan and added Chad, North Korea and officials from Venezuela and made the ban indefinite instead of temporary.

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National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off Saturday

The farmer’s market will have an extra flair this Saturday as National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off nearby with live dancing, Latin music, informational resources and more.

Bloomington has long celebrated the month to recognize the presence and contributions of Latino and Hispanic Americans, said Josefa Luce, Latino programs coordinator for the City of Bloomington.

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Military OneSource Is Now Available to Veterans and their Families for a Full Year After Separating from the Military

The Department of Defense announced today it will extend eligibility for Military OneSource benefits from the current 180 days to 365 days after separation or retirement from military service to ensure all service members and families have access to comprehensive support as they transition to civilian life. This change goes into effect today in accordance with the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2019.

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Hispanic-Owned Firms Packing Billion-Dollar Punch

INDIANAPOLIS – Hispanic-owned businesses in the Indianapolis area contribute more than $1 billion to the region’s economy, according to a new Indiana Business Research Center report. The study, commissioned by the Indy Chamber’s Hispanic Business Council, reports nearly 4,900 Hispanic-owned firms employing about 7,300 in the nine-county metro area.

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Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

Striker Ricardo Osuna, 17, who just graduated from Galax High and whose father is Mexican, says the Galax community is open and welcoming. But the opposing teams? Not so much.

“When we played, there was a bunch of racism,” he says. “Like, ‘Oh, wetbacks, get outta here!’ Once I got a yellow card, and they were like, ‘Hey ref, give him a green one, he probably needs it!’ Everybody was really mad about it.”

The Latino soccer players have powered the Galax team to four state championships in the last five years. The champion team is celebrated with a triumphant victory parade through town, escorted by fire trucks and police cars.

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Northern Indiana US courthouse flags honor late Judge Lozano

VALPARAISO, Ind. — Flags at federal courthouses in northern Indiana will fly at half-staff through Monday to honor late U.S. Senior Judge Rudy Lozano.

The court for the Northern District of Indiana announced Friday that the 76-year-old Lozano died Wednesday. A memorial Mass for Lozano will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Paul Catholic Church in Valparaiso.

President Ronald Reagan appointed Lozano, of East Chicago, the first Hispanic federal judge in Indiana in 1988. The court said he took senior status in July 2007 but continued to serve as a senior judge until his death.

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‘God Bless America’: 100 Years of an Immigrant’s Anthem

From this story, a classic piece of music emerged. The family, fleeing religious persecution in Russia in 1893, was soon reunited and allowed to enter the country. And that little boy, born Israel Beilin, would grow up to become Irving Berlin. Twenty-five years after emigrating, the same year he became an American citizen, he composed “God Bless America.”

[full story]

New immigration detention centers proposed for Indiana, other Midwest states

INDIANAPOLIS — Companies and local governments have proposed building new immigration detention centers in Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana, responding to a request from Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials stepping up arrests in the center of the country.

The proposals, most by for-profit corrections contractors, were submitted to ICE after it put out a request in October for detention sites near Chicago, Detroit, Salt Lake City and St. Paul, Minnesota. ICE disclosed the proposals in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the National Immigrant Justice Center, which provided the information to The Associated Press.

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What Americans totally misunderstand about immigration, in one chart

Immigration may be at the center of the American political debate, but a new Harvard University study shows Americans are missing a crucial piece of information.

Generally, people believe that immigrants are poorer, more dependent on welfare, and more numerous than they really are. That’s according to study published last month by the National Bureau of Economic Research, based on a 2018 survey in six developed countries.

Respondents in all of the countries held strong misconceptions about immigrants and their contributions to society, according to the poll’s results. But the discrepancy between perception and reality was particularly striking in the United States.

One example: On average, US respondents estimated that immigrants made up 36% of the US population. That is more than three times the real share of immigrants in the country, which is 10%.

[see chart here]

Hoosiers Participate In National Immigration Protests

Hundreds of activists gathered in at the Monroe County courthouse Saturday as part of a national movement to condemn the Trump administration’s immigration policy.

Speakers addressed the crowd about issues ranging from the travel ban that bars people from primarily Muslim nations, from coming to the United States, to ending immigrant family detention.

Gavin Everett, with the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs, says he’s concerned about those children who have already been separated from their parents.

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Immigration Attorney Explains Zero Tolerance Policies

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to gather this weekend to protest the “zero tolerance” immigration policies put in place by the Trump administration.

Children are no longer being separated from their parents, but more than 2,000 children are still being held in facilities across the. And many people are still upset with the crackdown at the border.

Immigration attorney Christie Popp joined WTIU’s Joe Hren on Indiana Newsdesk to explain the ongoing debate.

Indiana needs a hate crime bill

Indiana has a dubious commonality with Arkansas, Georgia, South Carolina and Wyoming. It is one of only four states that have no statutes criminalizing various types of bias-motivated violence or intimidation.

In a recent “Lunch With the League” presentation, Dr. Anita Joshi, who has practiced pediatrics in Crawfordsville for more than 20 years, made a clear case for the need of such legislation in Indiana.

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Five myths about the refugee crisis

Myth 5: History is repeating and there’s nothing we can do about it

The Holocaust is never far from the surface of European consciences. And its presence has been felt in a range of responses to the refugee crisis – from grand political statements about Europe’s duty to act, to the invocation of the Kindertransport in Britain’s debate over child refugees, to stories about elderly Jewish Europeans helping today’s displaced migrants cross borders. But it can lead us to a Schindler’s List interpretation of history – the one dramatic moment of rescue that either averts disaster, or absolves us of a greater crime.

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Small Indiana City Feels Aftermath Of Hurricane Maria

Warsaw-based Zimmer Biomet is located about 29 miles west of Columbia City. They also have a plant in Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria, Zimmer asked some of their Puerto Rican employees if they would relocate to plants in the continental U.S., like the one in Warsaw.

Local officials helped welcome the new residents but Columbia City Mayor Ryan Daniel had some concerns. When he heard the news, he worried about housing and whether the new residents would feel welcomed.

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Group hopes to break barriers for Latino community

On the adults’ end, Rivas said, it’s not that they don’t want to learn English, but rather that classes don’t line up with their work schedules and family obligations. In a lot of cases, Rivas said, the adults know some English, but hesitate to use it in formal situations out of fear of being judged or misunderstood.

The discussions also showed a perception among Anglos that Latinos don’t value education or work promotions as much as Anglos. Rivas said that’s not the case. Rather, the issue is that Latino parents don’t understand the U.S. education system, having not grown up with it, and the language barrier can make it difficult to learn about it. For promotions, Latino workers would like to be promoted, but are often hesitant because of Latino cultural norms. Latino families, for example, value keeping the family together above personal success. That can lead younger Latinos to turn down promotions that could elevate their status above someone else in their family or necessitate a move.

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The Most Inclusive U.S. Cities, Mapped

One of their top-line findings: The ten cities faring the best on the inclusion metrics in 2013 were also flourishing economically. “There is a strong relationship between the economic health of a city and a city’s ability to support inclusion for its residents,” the authors write in the report.

In a time of widening inequality, the findings of this report provide a roadmap for a deliberate effort to mitigate the forces that have created unequal communities. The authors conclude:

As this research illustrates, not all cities have made intentional progress, and, for some cities, economic conditions changed and prosperity was more widely shared. However, sustaining this progress toward more shared prosperity requires intentional effort, transparency, and policies.

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