Mike Pence’s Nephew: Meet Trump’s Latino Outreach Team

When the Trump reelection campaign kicked off its “Latinos for Trump” outreach effort in Miami this summer, it didn’t have the benefit of any Latino Cabinet members who might appeal to the large number of Spanish-speaking voters in the state. So it turned to the next best thing: Vice President Mike Pence.

It’s hard to imagine someone less suited to rally Latino voters than Pence, a non-Spanish-speaking white guy from Indiana, a state whose Latino population clocks in at a mere 7 percent. Yet there he was, walking on to the stage to Free’s “All Right Now” in a hotel ballroom full of cheering Latinos. “Hola Miami!” he cried, giving a big thumbs up. Speaking for 40 minutes, Pence hammered home Trump’s biggest selling points with Latino voters: the roaring economy, the low Latino unemployment rate, and the president’s robust opposition to socialism, especially in places like Venezuela.

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Trump got his wall, after all!

A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS”—THESE FOUR WORDS, (The phrase was popularized by John F. Kennedy, who used it as the title of his 1958 book),
genius in their concision, mask the messiest of histories. People like to recall that George Washington wanted America to “be an Asylum to the persecuted of the earth.” Less often praised: Ben Franklin’s contention that immigrants are “the most ignorant Stupid Sort of their own Nation.” Americans have been having some version of this argument ever since. And for much of the country’s existence, public opinion towards immigration has ranged from tepid to hostile. As Daniel Tichenor, author of the comprehensive history, “Dividing Lines,” puts it, “We love the immigrant past and dread the immigrant present.”

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Christina Hale Statement on Red for Ed Action Day

As one of the only members of the Indiana General Assembly of Latino descent at the time, Christina, who is Cuban-American, gave Hoosiers a new voice in Indianapolis. She most recently served as executive director of Kiwanis Youth Programs at Kiwanis International, where she has led programs locally and globally to improve the lives of children by expanding access to health care, education, and leadership opportunities.

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Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates with live music at the public library

Dagoberto Eliseo Toledo Bermudez sings in the band Mariachi Zelaya on Oct. 13 at Monroe County Public Library on East Kirkwood Avenue. Mariachi Zelaya performed as part of the library’s Hispanic Heritage Day event. JOY BURTON

Hearing the echoes of live music at a library is unusual. However, it draws a curious crowd.

This Sunday, the Monroe County Public Library celebrated Hispanic Heritage Day with performances by the Mariachi Band Zelaya, El Ballet Folklórico de IU and other dance companies.

The audience consisted of Bloomington families, IU students and library visitors of all ages.

A caricature artist drew sketches of families and couples. Young children were read to in Spanish, and completed crafts inspired by traditional forms of Latin American art.

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IU signs amicus brief sent to Supreme Court in support of DACA

IU expressed its support for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients in an amicus brief, which urged the Supreme Court stand in support of DACA recipients.

President Donald Trump decided to terminate DACA, a program created during the Obama Administration designed to give work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, in September 2017.

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Trump administration on immigrant suffers three legal defeats in one day

In a third defeat in less than a day for the Trump administration, a federal judge blocked it from vastly extending the authority of immigration officers to deport people without first allowing them to appear before judges.

The decision late Friday came before the policy, which was announced in July, was even enforced. The move would have applied to anyone in the country less than two years.

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Need for Pork Industry to Improve Relations with U.S. Latino Community

Mexico is the largest importer of U.S. pork, and a new report from the National Pork Board (NPB) shows there is an opportunity to capitalize on the U.S. Latino market.

The report called Time to Tango: Latinos are Pork’s Future, is the largest Insight to Action research from the Pork Checkoff. According to Bill Even, CEO of the NPB, Latinos have $1.7 billion in buying power, spending $95 billion each year on consumer-packaged goods, like groceries.

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