National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off Saturday

The farmer’s market will have an extra flair this Saturday as National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off nearby with live dancing, Latin music, informational resources and more.

Bloomington has long celebrated the month to recognize the presence and contributions of Latino and Hispanic Americans, said Josefa Luce, Latino programs coordinator for the City of Bloomington.

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Military OneSource Is Now Available to Veterans and their Families for a Full Year After Separating from the Military

The Department of Defense announced today it will extend eligibility for Military OneSource benefits from the current 180 days to 365 days after separation or retirement from military service to ensure all service members and families have access to comprehensive support as they transition to civilian life. This change goes into effect today in accordance with the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2019.

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Hispanic-Owned Firms Packing Billion-Dollar Punch

INDIANAPOLIS – Hispanic-owned businesses in the Indianapolis area contribute more than $1 billion to the region’s economy, according to a new Indiana Business Research Center report. The study, commissioned by the Indy Chamber’s Hispanic Business Council, reports nearly 4,900 Hispanic-owned firms employing about 7,300 in the nine-county metro area.

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Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

Striker Ricardo Osuna, 17, who just graduated from Galax High and whose father is Mexican, says the Galax community is open and welcoming. But the opposing teams? Not so much.

“When we played, there was a bunch of racism,” he says. “Like, ‘Oh, wetbacks, get outta here!’ Once I got a yellow card, and they were like, ‘Hey ref, give him a green one, he probably needs it!’ Everybody was really mad about it.”

The Latino soccer players have powered the Galax team to four state championships in the last five years. The champion team is celebrated with a triumphant victory parade through town, escorted by fire trucks and police cars.

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Northern Indiana US courthouse flags honor late Judge Lozano

VALPARAISO, Ind. — Flags at federal courthouses in northern Indiana will fly at half-staff through Monday to honor late U.S. Senior Judge Rudy Lozano.

The court for the Northern District of Indiana announced Friday that the 76-year-old Lozano died Wednesday. A memorial Mass for Lozano will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Paul Catholic Church in Valparaiso.

President Ronald Reagan appointed Lozano, of East Chicago, the first Hispanic federal judge in Indiana in 1988. The court said he took senior status in July 2007 but continued to serve as a senior judge until his death.

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‘God Bless America’: 100 Years of an Immigrant’s Anthem

From this story, a classic piece of music emerged. The family, fleeing religious persecution in Russia in 1893, was soon reunited and allowed to enter the country. And that little boy, born Israel Beilin, would grow up to become Irving Berlin. Twenty-five years after emigrating, the same year he became an American citizen, he composed “God Bless America.”

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New immigration detention centers proposed for Indiana, other Midwest states

INDIANAPOLIS — Companies and local governments have proposed building new immigration detention centers in Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana, responding to a request from Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials stepping up arrests in the center of the country.

The proposals, most by for-profit corrections contractors, were submitted to ICE after it put out a request in October for detention sites near Chicago, Detroit, Salt Lake City and St. Paul, Minnesota. ICE disclosed the proposals in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the National Immigrant Justice Center, which provided the information to The Associated Press.

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What Americans totally misunderstand about immigration, in one chart

Immigration may be at the center of the American political debate, but a new Harvard University study shows Americans are missing a crucial piece of information.

Generally, people believe that immigrants are poorer, more dependent on welfare, and more numerous than they really are. That’s according to study published last month by the National Bureau of Economic Research, based on a 2018 survey in six developed countries.

Respondents in all of the countries held strong misconceptions about immigrants and their contributions to society, according to the poll’s results. But the discrepancy between perception and reality was particularly striking in the United States.

One example: On average, US respondents estimated that immigrants made up 36% of the US population. That is more than three times the real share of immigrants in the country, which is 10%.

[see chart here]

Hoosiers Participate In National Immigration Protests

Hundreds of activists gathered in at the Monroe County courthouse Saturday as part of a national movement to condemn the Trump administration’s immigration policy.

Speakers addressed the crowd about issues ranging from the travel ban that bars people from primarily Muslim nations, from coming to the United States, to ending immigrant family detention.

Gavin Everett, with the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs, says he’s concerned about those children who have already been separated from their parents.

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Immigration Attorney Explains Zero Tolerance Policies

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to gather this weekend to protest the “zero tolerance” immigration policies put in place by the Trump administration.

Children are no longer being separated from their parents, but more than 2,000 children are still being held in facilities across the. And many people are still upset with the crackdown at the border.

Immigration attorney Christie Popp joined WTIU’s Joe Hren on Indiana Newsdesk to explain the ongoing debate.

Indiana needs a hate crime bill

Indiana has a dubious commonality with Arkansas, Georgia, South Carolina and Wyoming. It is one of only four states that have no statutes criminalizing various types of bias-motivated violence or intimidation.

In a recent “Lunch With the League” presentation, Dr. Anita Joshi, who has practiced pediatrics in Crawfordsville for more than 20 years, made a clear case for the need of such legislation in Indiana.

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Five myths about the refugee crisis

Myth 5: History is repeating and there’s nothing we can do about it

The Holocaust is never far from the surface of European consciences. And its presence has been felt in a range of responses to the refugee crisis – from grand political statements about Europe’s duty to act, to the invocation of the Kindertransport in Britain’s debate over child refugees, to stories about elderly Jewish Europeans helping today’s displaced migrants cross borders. But it can lead us to a Schindler’s List interpretation of history – the one dramatic moment of rescue that either averts disaster, or absolves us of a greater crime.

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Small Indiana City Feels Aftermath Of Hurricane Maria

Warsaw-based Zimmer Biomet is located about 29 miles west of Columbia City. They also have a plant in Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria, Zimmer asked some of their Puerto Rican employees if they would relocate to plants in the continental U.S., like the one in Warsaw.

Local officials helped welcome the new residents but Columbia City Mayor Ryan Daniel had some concerns. When he heard the news, he worried about housing and whether the new residents would feel welcomed.

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Group hopes to break barriers for Latino community

On the adults’ end, Rivas said, it’s not that they don’t want to learn English, but rather that classes don’t line up with their work schedules and family obligations. In a lot of cases, Rivas said, the adults know some English, but hesitate to use it in formal situations out of fear of being judged or misunderstood.

The discussions also showed a perception among Anglos that Latinos don’t value education or work promotions as much as Anglos. Rivas said that’s not the case. Rather, the issue is that Latino parents don’t understand the U.S. education system, having not grown up with it, and the language barrier can make it difficult to learn about it. For promotions, Latino workers would like to be promoted, but are often hesitant because of Latino cultural norms. Latino families, for example, value keeping the family together above personal success. That can lead younger Latinos to turn down promotions that could elevate their status above someone else in their family or necessitate a move.

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The Most Inclusive U.S. Cities, Mapped

One of their top-line findings: The ten cities faring the best on the inclusion metrics in 2013 were also flourishing economically. “There is a strong relationship between the economic health of a city and a city’s ability to support inclusion for its residents,” the authors write in the report.

In a time of widening inequality, the findings of this report provide a roadmap for a deliberate effort to mitigate the forces that have created unequal communities. The authors conclude:

As this research illustrates, not all cities have made intentional progress, and, for some cities, economic conditions changed and prosperity was more widely shared. However, sustaining this progress toward more shared prosperity requires intentional effort, transparency, and policies.

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IU students raise thousands to help favorite C-Store cashier’s daughter

Being a cashier at the C-Store in Indiana University Bloomington’s McNutt Quadrangle can be stressful. But Residential Programs and Services Dining employee Oscar Arreaza has a simple strategy for keeping his cool: He has fun.

“I have seen many cashiers over the years stressing themselves out,” Arreaza said. “What I do to avoid stressing is I always have a good time.”

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IU offers help to Puerto Rican graduate students

When news of Hurricane Maria hit IU, several members of the School of Education decided they wanted to do something to help.

The result became the IU Bloomington-Universidad de Puerto Rico Education Graduate Scholars program. This partnership created space for six graduate education students from the University of Puerto Rico to come work and study at IU-Bloomington.

Two of the main people driving this initiative are Professor Bradley Levinson and Associate Professor Carmen Medina from the School of Education.

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Black and Brown Arts Festival

Below you will find the link for you to sign up to be a participant at the inaugural Black and Brown Arts Fest.  Please remember art will be reviewed by an independent jury.  There is a $15 non-refundable fee for your provided space.
If you are under the age of 18, there may be scholarships available to you through our corporate sponsors.  If you would like more information regarding this, please contact me via email: gavineverett@gmail.com
We are very excited to have you involved with this great event.
Whether they wish to participate or spectate, the more people that show up, the more successful we will all be.
Sign up:
Thank you for being a part of the first ever Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Fest.  We look forward to seeing you all in May!

 

Indiana’s Working Families More Likely To Be Poor, Have Lower Incomes Than Midwestern Neighbors

(INDIANAPOLIS) – New data finds Indiana has the 19th-highest rate of working families who are low income (11th-highest among racial/ethnic minority families) but also 16th-lowest incomes.

Andrew Bradley, Senior Policy Analyst with Indiana Institute for Working Families, says work should not only be honorable and bring dignity, but should also pay for a family’s basic needs and provide opportunities to continue on a pathway to long-term economic security.

But new data shows that a higher proportion of Indiana’s working families remain low-income compared to our Midwestern neighbors, particularly Hoosiers of color. Indiana’s per capita income also trails most neighbors, with income growth that lags behind the national average suggesting that without a new policy direction, working Hoosier families aren’t likely to catch up soon.

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El Paso Mayor On National Guard Mexican Border Deployments

DEE MARGO: El Paso is one region of three states and two countries and a population of 2.7 million. But we’ve been involved with Mexico for over 400 years. So we’re pretty close and proximate here. We haven’t had – we’re considered the safest city in the United States. We don’t have any real issues. And we already have a fence that was established under the Bush administration that runs through our city, so…

 

 

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Submissions sought for inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival

Artists and performers of color are being sought for the inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival in May.

“The Bloomington Black & Brown Arts Festival is a celebration of African and Latino creative arts and artists to affirm community space, preserve arts appreciation, and enhance pride in the spirit of diversity of the Bloomington community,” according to a city press release. “The festival will provide a medium for local talent to showcase visual and performance art in an environment that engages the audience with artists and their work.”

The festival will take place on Saturday May 19 at the Bannerker Community Center from noon to 4 p.m.

Interested artists/performers have until Friday, April 27 at 5:30 p.m. to submit their pieces or work for a panel review that will take place on Saturday, May 5. Artists/performers selected will also be asked to submit a $15 non-refundable fee to reserve space.

A planning committee seeks a variety of art styles and forms to include as part of the festival. This includes but is not limited to spoken word, visual arts, ceramics, performance, dance and craft.

Works can be submitted on the web at bloomington.in.gov/bhm. For more information or questions about the festival contact the Safe and Civil City Program at safeandcivil@bloomington.in.gov, Latino Outreach Programs at latinoprograms@bloomington.in.gov, or call 812-349-3860.

This article originally ran on blogs.hoosiertimes.com.

A US vet facing deportation

A US Army veteran who served two tours in Afghanistan says he didn’t realize he’d been deported to Mexico until it was too late to turn back.

Speaking from Tijuana Monday, Miguel Perez told reporters that he’s feeling well physically, but is “very confused.”
Perez was escorted across the US-Mexico border from Texas and handed over to Mexican authorities Friday, ICE said in a statement. Perez says a truck took him to an airport in Indiana. He was then flown to Brownsville, Texas, ICE said.

Indiana Health Rankings Report

“Black and Hispanic children in Indiana are doing worse than white and Asian children,” said Willems Van Dijk.

In Indiana, Hamilton County near Indianapolis ranked as the healthiest county. The county placed first in health outcomes, which included length and quality of life statistics. Hamilton was also the best in health factors, including health behaviors, clinical care access, social and economic factors, and physical environment.