Immigration influx to Indiana

The candidates and their campaign advisers undoubtedly are stoking the anti-immigration fires because it’s proven effective in past practice or in polling. But if they want Indiana to grow and prosper, they should back off the fear-mongering. A new report from the Indiana Business Research Center suggests Indiana’s workforce will grow by only 34,000 between 2020 and 2050. The state’s economic future depends on its ability to attract young workers, including legal immigrants.

Matt Kinghorn, senior demographic analyst for the research center, notes the state’s labor force will record a “relatively healthy gain of 120,000 workers between 2010 and 2020” but will likely contract over the next decade as more baby boomers retire. Lower fertility rates affect the labor pool, as well. If rates had held steady to those recorded before the Great Recession, Indiana would see 70,000 more births than are expected in that decade-long span.

Migration is another factor, of course. Indiana saw its population and labor force declining through the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, but the trend was reversed with gains in net migration between 1990 and 2010. Hispanic residents moving into the state were responsible for 77 percent of the gain, according to data from the Applied Population Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin.

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Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

Striker Ricardo Osuna, 17, who just graduated from Galax High and whose father is Mexican, says the Galax community is open and welcoming. But the opposing teams? Not so much.

“When we played, there was a bunch of racism,” he says. “Like, ‘Oh, wetbacks, get outta here!’ Once I got a yellow card, and they were like, ‘Hey ref, give him a green one, he probably needs it!’ Everybody was really mad about it.”

The Latino soccer players have powered the Galax team to four state championships in the last five years. The champion team is celebrated with a triumphant victory parade through town, escorted by fire trucks and police cars.

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What Americans totally misunderstand about immigration, in one chart

Immigration may be at the center of the American political debate, but a new Harvard University study shows Americans are missing a crucial piece of information.

Generally, people believe that immigrants are poorer, more dependent on welfare, and more numerous than they really are. That’s according to study published last month by the National Bureau of Economic Research, based on a 2018 survey in six developed countries.

Respondents in all of the countries held strong misconceptions about immigrants and their contributions to society, according to the poll’s results. But the discrepancy between perception and reality was particularly striking in the United States.

One example: On average, US respondents estimated that immigrants made up 36% of the US population. That is more than three times the real share of immigrants in the country, which is 10%.

[see chart here]

Immigration Attorney Explains Zero Tolerance Policies

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to gather this weekend to protest the “zero tolerance” immigration policies put in place by the Trump administration.

Children are no longer being separated from their parents, but more than 2,000 children are still being held in facilities across the. And many people are still upset with the crackdown at the border.

Immigration attorney Christie Popp joined WTIU’s Joe Hren on Indiana Newsdesk to explain the ongoing debate.

Five myths about the refugee crisis

Myth 5: History is repeating and there’s nothing we can do about it

The Holocaust is never far from the surface of European consciences. And its presence has been felt in a range of responses to the refugee crisis – from grand political statements about Europe’s duty to act, to the invocation of the Kindertransport in Britain’s debate over child refugees, to stories about elderly Jewish Europeans helping today’s displaced migrants cross borders. But it can lead us to a Schindler’s List interpretation of history – the one dramatic moment of rescue that either averts disaster, or absolves us of a greater crime.

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Small Indiana City Feels Aftermath Of Hurricane Maria

Warsaw-based Zimmer Biomet is located about 29 miles west of Columbia City. They also have a plant in Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria, Zimmer asked some of their Puerto Rican employees if they would relocate to plants in the continental U.S., like the one in Warsaw.

Local officials helped welcome the new residents but Columbia City Mayor Ryan Daniel had some concerns. When he heard the news, he worried about housing and whether the new residents would feel welcomed.

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Group hopes to break barriers for Latino community

On the adults’ end, Rivas said, it’s not that they don’t want to learn English, but rather that classes don’t line up with their work schedules and family obligations. In a lot of cases, Rivas said, the adults know some English, but hesitate to use it in formal situations out of fear of being judged or misunderstood.

The discussions also showed a perception among Anglos that Latinos don’t value education or work promotions as much as Anglos. Rivas said that’s not the case. Rather, the issue is that Latino parents don’t understand the U.S. education system, having not grown up with it, and the language barrier can make it difficult to learn about it. For promotions, Latino workers would like to be promoted, but are often hesitant because of Latino cultural norms. Latino families, for example, value keeping the family together above personal success. That can lead younger Latinos to turn down promotions that could elevate their status above someone else in their family or necessitate a move.

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The Most Inclusive U.S. Cities, Mapped

One of their top-line findings: The ten cities faring the best on the inclusion metrics in 2013 were also flourishing economically. “There is a strong relationship between the economic health of a city and a city’s ability to support inclusion for its residents,” the authors write in the report.

In a time of widening inequality, the findings of this report provide a roadmap for a deliberate effort to mitigate the forces that have created unequal communities. The authors conclude:

As this research illustrates, not all cities have made intentional progress, and, for some cities, economic conditions changed and prosperity was more widely shared. However, sustaining this progress toward more shared prosperity requires intentional effort, transparency, and policies.

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El Paso Mayor On National Guard Mexican Border Deployments

DEE MARGO: El Paso is one region of three states and two countries and a population of 2.7 million. But we’ve been involved with Mexico for over 400 years. So we’re pretty close and proximate here. We haven’t had – we’re considered the safest city in the United States. We don’t have any real issues. And we already have a fence that was established under the Bush administration that runs through our city, so…

 

 

[Read transcript]

Trump Uses MS-13 To “Sell Draconian Overhauls Of Border Issues”

MS-13, for him, solves all kinds of rhetorical problems. So first of all, he wants to portray immigrants nationwide as being criminals. And that’s obviously empirically untrue. But also statistically, that’s wildly inaccurate. Crime in immigrant communities tends to be much lower. Immigrants tend to be much more law abiding than citizens.

It helps him shape the debate on DREAMers and recipients of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which is kind of a big congressional issue now ever since Trump canceled the program in September of 2017. He often mentions the two in the same sentence as a way of trying to sell wholesale draconian overhauls of border security measures and interior enforcement measures. MS-13 is useful for him there.

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The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

“Our founding documents were all published in German to accommodate the German-speaking populations. For most of the 19th century, instruction in public schools across the country – from Pennsylvania to Texas to Wisconsin – occurred entirely in languages other than English, or bilingually. And this practice was not abolished until the first decades of the 20th century.”

Nor did immigrants of that era classify themselves as legal or illegal.

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Letter from City Commission regarding current latino affairs

October 4, 2017

Members of the Bloomington Community,

For years the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs has served to identify and research the issues which impact the Hispanic/Latino populations in Bloomington, especially in the areas of health, education, public safety and cultural competency.

We support all Hispanics/Latinos including immigrants, refugees, and multi-generational U.S.-born folks who despite lifetimes in the U.S. are identified as Hispanic/Latino according to U.S. census.  While the commission is not affiliated or motivated by any political party, we cannot deny that our work and sentiment is affected by the national rhetoric which vilifies and, in some cases, criminalizes the very existence of people in our community.

The decision to end DACA destabilizes the lives and futures for hundreds of thousands of folks who have no other crime than having been born outside of the lines you and I know as the U.S. border.  The impact of the DACA repeal means splitting up families, interrupting communities and workplaces, and deporting adults and children to countries they have never really known.  And for those of us who stay, we lose relationships, and we lose our emotional and economic investments in believing in and professing an American dream for all.

We hope to serve as a catalyst to promote positive public and private solutions to multi-faceted issues confronting Hispanic/Latino neighbors ensuring to document the resulting effects of action and inaction on our community.  We unreservedly oppose the decision of the Trump Administration to end DACA especially without a defined and humane path forward for our neighbors, friends, and family.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has studied and proposed common sense immigration reform for years and published detailed analysis to dispel myths, which are used for political advantage.  Opinions and false conclusions have been related as truths regarding “illegals” so we compiled a shortlist of facts for clarity.

Undocumented folks:
1. Do not receive free government healthcare.  Undocumented folks do not qualify for Medicaid or the Healthy Indiana Plan.

2. Do not take jobs that would be filled by citizens.  There is no correlation between high unemployment and immigration.  Findings indicate undocumented folks become entrepreneurs – create jobs – at twice the rate as U.S.-born folks.

3. Do pay taxes.  Taxes paid by undocumented folks proportionately to U.S.-born folks include property, excise, and sales tax.  Also federal, state and local income taxes, Social Security and Medicare taxes are automatically deducted from paychecks just like everyone else.  In 2013, undocumented folks contributed $11.6 billion in state and local taxes.

4.  Are not eligible tax-funded benefit programs.  Data from the Social Security Administration shows that in 2010 undocumented folks paid $13 billion in payroll taxes to Social Security and Medicare, benefits that are only accessible to citizens.

Additional findings by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce include:

– Immigrants do not drive down wages of U.S.-born workers.

–  Immigrants have economically revitalized many communities.

–  Immigrants do not cause crime rates to rise and are less likely to commit crime than U.S.-born individuals.

–  Mass deportation of undocumented immigrants would severely damage the U.S. economy.

Facts and statistics aside, we must remember that DACA recipients are human beings and members of our community.  DACA recipients have lived in the U.S. most of their lives – this is home.   DACA recipients have families, jobs, and contributors to our community.  To drive them away will not just damage our community as a whole but, at its base, it is cruel and inhumane.

Sincerely,
City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs

CHLA Letter to HT October 4 2017

Federal judge prohibits ICE detainers in Marion County

A federal judge has approved of a settlement between the ACLU of Indiana and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office to end Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold requests on people accused of living in the country illegally unless there is a warrant.

The action comes despite the U.S. Justice Department’s intervention in the case and requests that the Sheriff’s Office comply with the ICE seizure requests.

In a 36-page order handed down Tuesday evening, U.S. District Judge Sarah Evans Barker issued an injunction that prevents the Sheriff’s Office from detaining any person based solely on detention requests from ICE unless there is a warrant or probable cause.

An ICE detainer is a request of local police to hold people in jail beyond the time when they otherwise should be released, generally a 48-hour period. ICE is seeking more time to check their citizenship status and, if needed, get a deportation warrant, even if the initial arrest is for something minor, say a traffic infraction.

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Immigrants are helping to give some struggling cities a new lease on life

Immigrants are helping to give some struggling cities a new lease on life. In Hartford, CT; Newark, NJ; Stockton, CA; and Trenton, NJ, more than one in five residents are now foreign-born. In general, cities with smaller foreign-born populations are more likely to be distressed: In the average distressed city, 15 percent of the population is foreign-born; in all other quintiles, the average is between 18 and 19 percent.

[Distress Community Index Report]

Places with the fewest immigrants push back hardest against immigration

The paradox of this emotional debate is that generally the states and communities with the fewest immigrants are pushing to reduce immigration over the objections of the places with the most immigrants.
Even as Republicans from President Trump to leading legislators in the House and Senate are driving to reduce both undocumented and legal immigration, the core of the GOP’s electoral strength in both presidential and Congressional contests are the places with the smallest share of immigrants, US Census data show.

Do Undocumented Immigrants Pay Taxes?

“Do you think an illegal immigrant getting money is going to be paying taxes? Sure, some probably do only because employers are insisting on it. But there’s very little percentage wise very little, probably 5 percent, 10 percent. It’s a very small amount pay taxes … Look, they’re here illegally. They’re not paying taxes.”

On the surface, the claim seems plausible. This is a population that largely lives in the shadows. And it’s fair to assume that many undocumented workers are paid under the table, with little incentive to report their earnings.

But while this may be the case for some, it certainly does not hold true for the majority.

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Agency having money issues: Fundraisers not getting attention from residents

“We don’t have any federal or state funding, and we are not part of United Way,” she said. “What we need right now is the funds to keep our operations and doors open for three days a week. That would be good for us to be able to keep serving our clients.”

About 80 families visit the agency a month asking for help with translating birth certificates, identification cards and other written documents or correspondence. The agency also helps write résumés and letters of permission for children to travel and assistance with applications for services offered within the community.

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The most decorated US WWI veteran from Texas was actually a Mexican immigrant

On April 26, 1896, in Chihuahua, Mexico, Marcelino Serna was born into a very poor family.  He left home at the age of twenty, and crossed the border into the United States, traveling to El Paso, Texas to find a job and improve his life.  Since he didn’t speak English, he had to take low-paying jobs and was soon working in Denver, Colorado on a sugar beet farm.

When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, Serna was in Denver working with a group of men who were picked up by federal officers checking the draft status of potential soldiers.  To prevent his deportation to Mexico, Serna volunteered to join the Army.

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These robotics students were told ‘to go back to Mexico.’

Just a few months ago, not many knew about these five fourth-graders from a low-income community in Indianapolis.

But now, the Panther Bots, a thriving robotics team at Pleasant Run Elementary School, have become the face of a success story about a group of kids who were taunted with racial slurs but were too determined to let that affect their confidence. Earlier this month, they found themselves being honored on the Senate floor of the Indiana Statehouse. The group travels to Louisville on Sunday to compete in a worldwide robotics contest.

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Army Vet Who Served Two Tours In Afghanistan To Be Deported

A Chicago immigration judge ruled last week that an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan be deported back to Mexico, according to a local ABC affiliate.

The decision comes after Miguel Perez Jr. served seven years in prison for a felony drug offense. Perez, 38, was born in Mexico but has lived in the United States since the age of 8. He enlisted in the Army as a legal permanent resident in 2001 and served two tours in Afghanistan with U.S. Special Forces.

“My son served for this country, not for Mexico,” Perez’s mother, Esperanza Medina, told reporters at a Pilsen church on Sunday. 

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Illegal Immigration Doesn’t Always Match Reality

When you think of illegal immigration in the U.S., do you picture a border crosser or a visa overstayer? A family or a single person? A farmworker or a waiter?

People living in the U.S. without legal status are frequently invoked in American politics especially in recent months. But the conversation is often short on facts about the millions of people who fall into this category.

There are, however, outdated beliefs: A Pew Research Center survey in 2015 found that very few Americans are aware of recent changes in immigration patterns.

For example, the top 10 countries for visa overstays in FY 2015: #1. Canada (~93,000), #2. Mexico (~42,000)…

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