Banning immigrants’ languages can backfire. Just ask Ohio and Indiana.

Swept up in the sauerkraut-is-now-liberty-cabbage nationalist hysteria surrounding World War I, Ohio and Indiana sought to force their large German minorities to assimilate by banning the German language in schools in 1919.
New evidence shows that their heavy-handed approach backfired. The Supreme Court struck down the bans in 1923. But students who grew up under the bans were less likely to assimilate, according to an analysis by Stanford political scientist and economist Vicky Fouka soon to be published in the Review of Economic Studies.

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Friends remember Horseshoe Bend soldier who died in Iraq

Osorio enlisted in the Army in July 2017 after graduating from Horseshoe Bend High School and was on his first deployment. In less than two years in the military, he was decorated with several awards, including the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal.

KTVB spoke with some of his friends Wednesday night. They told us he loved his country and would do anything to help others.

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Brokaw suggested Latino immigrants’ kids don’t assimilate. That’s a myth!

Historians have noted that this is a tale as old as the United States itself. The very same critiques we hear now about Latino immigrants were once used to criticize large groups of immigrants who arrived from Europe. And over the past few decades, this kind of comment has been a regular refrain as part of arguments against immigration.
But for years, study after study has shown it simply isn’t true.
As Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography for the Pew Research Center, noted on Twitter, Latinos’ English proficiency has been on the rise for years. In fact, researchers have observed this for over a decade, he told CNN.

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Five myths about MS-13

The Trump administration’s campaign against immigration conflates the flow of undocumented immigrants from Central America with the growth of MS-13 – the brutal transnational street gang. The president and the attorney general frequently say that stopping the former means stopping the latter. Information about the four-decade-old gang, formally named Mara Salvatrucha, is scarce, but we know enough to dispel some of the misconceptions that have grown up around it.

Myth No. 1
MS-13 was created by Salvadoran ex-guerrillas.

The gang originated in Los Angeles, mostly in the areas of Korea Town, Pico Union and Westlake, in the early 1980s. It was formed by children of refugees

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Undocumented immigrants pay billions of dollars in federal taxes each year

One of the biggest misconceptions about undocumented immigrants is that they don’t pay any taxes. In his first address to Congress, President Trump set the tone for his coming immigration agenda when he said immigration costs US taxpayers “billions of dollars a year.”

A 2017 Gallup poll that asked survey respondents “whether immigrants to the United States are making the [tax] situation in the country better or worse” found that 41 percent said “worse,” while only 23 percent said “better” (33 percent said they had “no effect”).

The reality is far different. Immigrants who are authorized to work in the United States pay the same taxes as US citizens. And, contrary to the persistent myth, undocumented immigrants do in fact pay taxes too. Millions of undocumented immigrants file tax returns each year, and they are paying taxes for benefits they can’t even use.

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Does Immigration Hurt or Help Social Security?

Another factor that often gets a finger pointed at it by critics is immigration — more specifically, undocumented workers. Peruse social media and, among the fictitious claims that the government raided Social Security, you’re bound to find comments claiming that Social Security is being hurt by legal and illegal immigration into the United States.

But is this the case? Let’s have a closer look.

Undocumented workers, by law, can’t qualify for a Social Security number and therefore are ineligible for a retired worker benefit, as well as disability and survivor’s insurance protection. Unless migrants are on a legal path to citizenship and earning lifetime work credits, they won’t qualify for a benefit from either the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust or the Disability Insurance Trust.

However, this doesn’t mean undocumented workers aren’t contributing in some way to the Social Security program. According to AARP, approximately $12 billion in payroll tax revenue (from either the workers or their employers) was collected in 2010 from undocumented migrants.

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Immigration influx to Indiana

The candidates and their campaign advisers undoubtedly are stoking the anti-immigration fires because it’s proven effective in past practice or in polling. But if they want Indiana to grow and prosper, they should back off the fear-mongering. A new report from the Indiana Business Research Center suggests Indiana’s workforce will grow by only 34,000 between 2020 and 2050. The state’s economic future depends on its ability to attract young workers, including legal immigrants.

Matt Kinghorn, senior demographic analyst for the research center, notes the state’s labor force will record a “relatively healthy gain of 120,000 workers between 2010 and 2020” but will likely contract over the next decade as more baby boomers retire. Lower fertility rates affect the labor pool, as well. If rates had held steady to those recorded before the Great Recession, Indiana would see 70,000 more births than are expected in that decade-long span.

Migration is another factor, of course. Indiana saw its population and labor force declining through the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, but the trend was reversed with gains in net migration between 1990 and 2010. Hispanic residents moving into the state were responsible for 77 percent of the gain, according to data from the Applied Population Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin.

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