Need for Pork Industry to Improve Relations with U.S. Latino Community

Mexico is the largest importer of U.S. pork, and a new report from the National Pork Board (NPB) shows there is an opportunity to capitalize on the U.S. Latino market.

The report called Time to Tango: Latinos are Pork’s Future, is the largest Insight to Action research from the Pork Checkoff. According to Bill Even, CEO of the NPB, Latinos have $1.7 billion in buying power, spending $95 billion each year on consumer-packaged goods, like groceries.

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5 Common Myths About Fair Trade Coffee

We are at a critical moment in the coffee industry. The New York Coffee “C” Contract price—which is basically the benchmark for determining price between producers and buyers—dropped from around $2 a pound in 2014 to 89 cents in 2019—a more than 50 percent drop and a 14-year low. At this price, coffee farmers are unable to cover even the most basic costs associated with coffee production.

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DOD Identifies Army Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz, 34, from Morovis, Puerto Rico, was killed in action Sept. 5, 2019, when a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle in Kabul, Afghanistan. The incident is under investigation.

Ortiz was assigned to the 82nd Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Employers Struggle With Hiring Undocumented Workers: ‘You Cannot Hire American Here’

The Pew Research Center estimates there are 7.5 million unauthorized workers in the United States concentrated in agriculture, construction and the hospitality industry.
Karina Perez for NPR

Like thousands of other restaurants across America, Lynn’s kitchen is staffed mainly with unauthorized Latino workers. She agreed to openly discuss this employment conundrum if NPR agreed not to give her last name, identify her restaurant, name the city, or even specify the type of cuisine. Like a lot of employers these days, she doesn’t want to attract the attention of federal immigration agents.

When asked how many eating establishments have undocumented workers in the kitchen in her Midwestern city, Lynn states flatly: “A hundred percent. You cannot hire American here.”

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DOD Identifies Army Casualties

Master Sgt.* Luis F. DeLeon-Figueroa, 31, of Chicopee, Massachusetts.
Master Sgt.* Jose J. Gonzalez, 35, of La Puente, California.

Both soldiers died August 21, 2019 in Faryab Province, Afghanistan, as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire while engaged in combat operations. The incident is under investigation.

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Hispanic-owned businesses are finding a home in Indianapolis

Manuel Morales first came to the state as a migrant worker, traveling 1,300 miles from his hometown on the southern Texas border to pick summer crops for the season. After six years of making the hard journey, Manuel decided to stop migrating and plant some roots of his own in 1955 Indianapolis.

At the time, Indiana’s Hispanic population was somewhere between 0 and 1 percent. When Manuel lay dying of cancer several years later, he asked his son, Tomás, to give back to the city’s small Hispanic community. Tomás took his father’s words to heart and formed Morales Group in 2003, now one of the largest Hispanic-owned staffing agencies in the city.

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Banning immigrants’ languages can backfire. Just ask Ohio and Indiana.

Swept up in the sauerkraut-is-now-liberty-cabbage nationalist hysteria surrounding World War I, Ohio and Indiana sought to force their large German minorities to assimilate by banning the German language in schools in 1919.
New evidence shows that their heavy-handed approach backfired. The Supreme Court struck down the bans in 1923. But students who grew up under the bans were less likely to assimilate, according to an analysis by Stanford political scientist and economist Vicky Fouka soon to be published in the Review of Economic Studies.

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