Video On Public Charge

Posted by Popp & Bullman, Attorneys-at-Law on Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Christie Popp
Popp & Bullman
Attorneys-at-Law
205 N. College Ave. Ste 615
Bloomington, Indiana 47404
(812) 323-3339
www.poppbullman.com

Submissions sought for inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival

Artists and performers of color are being sought for the inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival in May.

“The Bloomington Black & Brown Arts Festival is a celebration of African and Latino creative arts and artists to affirm community space, preserve arts appreciation, and enhance pride in the spirit of diversity of the Bloomington community,” according to a city press release. “The festival will provide a medium for local talent to showcase visual and performance art in an environment that engages the audience with artists and their work.”

The festival will take place on Saturday May 19 at the Bannerker Community Center from noon to 4 p.m.

Interested artists/performers have until Friday, April 27 at 5:30 p.m. to submit their pieces or work for a panel review that will take place on Saturday, May 5. Artists/performers selected will also be asked to submit a $15 non-refundable fee to reserve space.

A planning committee seeks a variety of art styles and forms to include as part of the festival. This includes but is not limited to spoken word, visual arts, ceramics, performance, dance and craft.

Works can be submitted on the web at bloomington.in.gov/bhm. For more information or questions about the festival contact the Safe and Civil City Program at safeandcivil@bloomington.in.gov, Latino Outreach Programs at latinoprograms@bloomington.in.gov, or call 812-349-3860.

This article originally ran on blogs.hoosiertimes.com.

Testigos Pro Inmigrantes (Pro-Immigration Witnesses)

Testigos Pro Immigrantes pueden guardar documentos:

Los Testigos Pro Inmigrantes son un grupo de voluntarios que an enfocado sus esfuerzos para apoyar a los inmigrantes en estos tiempos difíciles. No intervenimos directamente con las autoridades, pero con tu consentimiento, te apoyamos y te acompañamos como un amigo.

Una de las formas en que te podemos apoyar es guardando en un lugar seguro documentos que puedan ser importantes en caso de algún problema. Por ejemplo, que un Poder o algún otro documento Notariado estén seguros y asegurar que lleguen a ti o a la persona adecuada, como tu abogado u otro miembro de la familia en caso de una emergencia.

Te podemos acompañar a tus audiencias y diligencias judiciales. Como tus citas con La Migra (ICE) u otras actividades donde potencialmente te sientas incomodo ir solo. Creemos que el solo hecho de ir acompañado puede ayudar a prevenir abusos por parte de las autoridades, cortes u otros oficiales.

Podemos ser testigos (en pareja) si La Migra (ICE) aparece en tu hogar, tu lugar de trabajo o cualquier otro lugar. Como testigos, podemos ayudarte a documentar con notas, video, o grabación de audio lo que esta pasando. Luego podemos utilizar esa evidencia recolectada a tu favor, ya sea para entregarla a tu abogado o para usarla apropiadamente y positivamente con tu consentimiento. Creemos que el solo hecho de estar acompañado puede ayudar a prevenir abusos por parte de las autoridades, cortes u otros oficiales.

Hablemos para ver como te podemos acompañar en caso de una redada, para que te sientas acompañado y para que alguien este velando por tu bien.

Pregunta en El Centro Comunal de Bloomington o en las oficinas de la  ciudad para mas información

Letter from City Commission regarding current latino affairs

October 4, 2017

Members of the Bloomington Community,

For years the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs has served to identify and research the issues which impact the Hispanic/Latino populations in Bloomington, especially in the areas of health, education, public safety and cultural competency.

We support all Hispanics/Latinos including immigrants, refugees, and multi-generational U.S.-born folks who despite lifetimes in the U.S. are identified as Hispanic/Latino according to U.S. census.  While the commission is not affiliated or motivated by any political party, we cannot deny that our work and sentiment is affected by the national rhetoric which vilifies and, in some cases, criminalizes the very existence of people in our community.

The decision to end DACA destabilizes the lives and futures for hundreds of thousands of folks who have no other crime than having been born outside of the lines you and I know as the U.S. border.  The impact of the DACA repeal means splitting up families, interrupting communities and workplaces, and deporting adults and children to countries they have never really known.  And for those of us who stay, we lose relationships, and we lose our emotional and economic investments in believing in and professing an American dream for all.

We hope to serve as a catalyst to promote positive public and private solutions to multi-faceted issues confronting Hispanic/Latino neighbors ensuring to document the resulting effects of action and inaction on our community.  We unreservedly oppose the decision of the Trump Administration to end DACA especially without a defined and humane path forward for our neighbors, friends, and family.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has studied and proposed common sense immigration reform for years and published detailed analysis to dispel myths, which are used for political advantage.  Opinions and false conclusions have been related as truths regarding “illegals” so we compiled a shortlist of facts for clarity.

Undocumented folks:
1. Do not receive free government healthcare.  Undocumented folks do not qualify for Medicaid or the Healthy Indiana Plan.

2. Do not take jobs that would be filled by citizens.  There is no correlation between high unemployment and immigration.  Findings indicate undocumented folks become entrepreneurs – create jobs – at twice the rate as U.S.-born folks.

3. Do pay taxes.  Taxes paid by undocumented folks proportionately to U.S.-born folks include property, excise, and sales tax.  Also federal, state and local income taxes, Social Security and Medicare taxes are automatically deducted from paychecks just like everyone else.  In 2013, undocumented folks contributed $11.6 billion in state and local taxes.

4.  Are not eligible tax-funded benefit programs.  Data from the Social Security Administration shows that in 2010 undocumented folks paid $13 billion in payroll taxes to Social Security and Medicare, benefits that are only accessible to citizens.

Additional findings by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce include:

– Immigrants do not drive down wages of U.S.-born workers.

–  Immigrants have economically revitalized many communities.

–  Immigrants do not cause crime rates to rise and are less likely to commit crime than U.S.-born individuals.

–  Mass deportation of undocumented immigrants would severely damage the U.S. economy.

Facts and statistics aside, we must remember that DACA recipients are human beings and members of our community.  DACA recipients have lived in the U.S. most of their lives – this is home.   DACA recipients have families, jobs, and contributors to our community.  To drive them away will not just damage our community as a whole but, at its base, it is cruel and inhumane.

Sincerely,
City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs

CHLA Letter to HT October 4 2017

BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

DE PUEBLO A PUEBLO: A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH, 2017
BUSKIRK-CHUMLEY THEATRE
7:00 p.m.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo: A Benefit Concert for Puerto Rico, Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands’ serves as the kickoff event to raise funds for communities in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean recently impacted by devastating natural disasters. The event will showcase a diverse collection of Latin American and Caribbean music, performed by artists who have made Southern Indiana their home, including performances by cellist Emilio Colón, Mariachi Perla del Medio Oeste, Orquesta Escuela Vieja, Soneros la Caliza and other special guests. It will also feature a series of short presentations by Bloomington community members who have recently visited the affected areas.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo ~ From People to People,’ is a volunteer-based initiative of concerned citizens from Bloomington, Indiana, many of whom have personal and/or professional roots in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean. This effort counts with the support of the City of Bloomington, local community leaders and organizations, Indiana University faculty, students and staff, as well as the collaboration of the Centro Comunal Latino, the Center for Sustainable Living and the Narra Foundation.

Want to help? Please consider making a donation. Thank you!

Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Caribbean relief efforts

Dear community:

As all of you are aware, neighbors in our hemisphere have suffered tremendous loss in recent weeks. Mexico’s earthquakes hit very hard the southern states, Mexico City and Morelia. In addition, two hurricanes, Irma and María, devastated many Caribbean nations, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. As members of the Indiana University community, we are reaching out to our colleagues, students, staff, and friends in an effort to provide support to our many sister communities, where many of us who are part of IU have our roots as well as many family members and friends.

Hoping to contribute to the relief efforts, we have identified organizations that are assisting communities affected by these catastrophic events. Most of these organizations have been vetted by independent agencies and have an established track record of working with local communities in need. Following is a list of organizations/agencies that are providing relief to Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean. The websites provide information about the mission of these organizations and instructions about how to make donations online.

Mexico Earthquake Relief:
International Community Foundation:
https://donate.icfdn.org/npo/international-disaster-relief-fund

National Museum of Mexican Art Chicago for Mexico and Puerto Rico Relief Fund:
http://nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org/relief

Hispanic Federation:
https://hispanicfederation.org/donate

Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief:
Hurricane María Community Recovery Fund: https://connect.clickandpledge.com/w/Form/cb4a3c78-5694-4324-bead-42c8ad94c1bf

Episcopal Relief Fund:
http://www.episcopalrelief.org/

Fundación Comunitaria de Puerto Rico:
https://www.fcpr.org

U.S. Virgin Islands and the Caribbean:
All Hands:
https://www.hands.org/projects/hurricane-irma-maria-response/

Unicef:
https://www.unicefusa.org

Your contribution is greatly appreciated. These communities will survive and thrive, but need our support.

Thank you. Gracias.

In solidarity/En solidaridad,

Raquel Anderson – Professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Arlene J. Díaz – Associate Professor, Department of History
Luis A. González – Associate Librarian, IU Libraries
Juan Manuel Soto-Arriví – Senior Lecturer, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

Immigration Witnesses

Dear People of Good Will,

A new group called Immigration Witnesses is working on a plan to help support immigrants at risk for deportation at this time of acute anti-immigrant rhetoric & action at the federal level which reaches into each state, county, and town.  We are inviting local community members to become involved.

There are three ways community members can help:

1. Accompaniment of a person or family
This means that the accompanier will be given the names of 5 immigrant people, and the 5 immigrant people will receive the accompanier’s phone number.  The immigrant will call when afraid of being detained and if and when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers arrive for that purpose.  Accompaniers will be trained by lawyers about what they can do and say when they are with the immigrant and ICE.

2. Holding important documents
This means that the support person will keep copies of Power of Attorney and Guardianship papers so that if the immigrant is detained, the papers can be taken to the person who has the POA and/or Guardian.

3. Documenting and communicating with the media
Individuals who are doing accompaniment will be making videos of interactions on the street or when ICE comes.  The people who take on this role will be witnesses about what has happened.  They will be asked to write letters to the editor and/or post the videos online.

Contact “El Centro” or “City of Bloomington Latino Outreach”

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