Sueños pausados

Aquel martes comenzó como cualquier otro.  María Chávez Juárez estaba sentada en su clase de criminología, Sandy Rivera estaba en astronomía y Kemberly Hernández estaba en el Campus Center de IUPUI. Muy pronto el celular de María, que estaba entre sus piernas, empezó a vibrar con cada mensaje que recibía.

Ella empezó a mirar los mensajes de Snapchat olvidándose de escuchar a su profesor. El Presidente de los Estados Unidos había enviado un mensaje de Twitter al mundo:

“Congreso, alístese a hacer su trabajo – DACA!”

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Trump Uses MS-13 To “Sell Draconian Overhauls Of Border Issues”

MS-13, for him, solves all kinds of rhetorical problems. So first of all, he wants to portray immigrants nationwide as being criminals. And that’s obviously empirically untrue. But also statistically, that’s wildly inaccurate. Crime in immigrant communities tends to be much lower. Immigrants tend to be much more law abiding than citizens.

It helps him shape the debate on DREAMers and recipients of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which is kind of a big congressional issue now ever since Trump canceled the program in September of 2017. He often mentions the two in the same sentence as a way of trying to sell wholesale draconian overhauls of border security measures and interior enforcement measures. MS-13 is useful for him there.

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Heartland Democrats to Washington: You’re Killing Us

AUSTIN, Ind.—Steering his white Dodge Ram while wearing a tan knit cap, a drab green Carhartt coat and a smear of brown livestock feed on his cheek, Terry Goodin jounced over frozen-hard mud toward his 100 head of beef cattle. “Make sure they’re all four legs down and not four legs up, in this kind of weather,” he told me in his southern Indiana drawl. The temperature overnight had dipped toward zero. Now, midmorning, it stood at 16 degrees. On the rear of his old pickup truck was a “Farmers For Goodin” bumper sticker, and rattling around his head were thoughts of what he was going to say the following week in a starkly different setting—up in Indianapolis, at the regal limestone capitol building, in his introductory speech as the leader of his caucus in the state legislature.

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Letter from City Commission regarding current latino affairs

October 4, 2017

Members of the Bloomington Community,

For years the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs has served to identify and research the issues which impact the Hispanic/Latino populations in Bloomington, especially in the areas of health, education, public safety and cultural competency.

We support all Hispanics/Latinos including immigrants, refugees, and multi-generational U.S.-born folks who despite lifetimes in the U.S. are identified as Hispanic/Latino according to U.S. census.  While the commission is not affiliated or motivated by any political party, we cannot deny that our work and sentiment is affected by the national rhetoric which vilifies and, in some cases, criminalizes the very existence of people in our community.

The decision to end DACA destabilizes the lives and futures for hundreds of thousands of folks who have no other crime than having been born outside of the lines you and I know as the U.S. border.  The impact of the DACA repeal means splitting up families, interrupting communities and workplaces, and deporting adults and children to countries they have never really known.  And for those of us who stay, we lose relationships, and we lose our emotional and economic investments in believing in and professing an American dream for all.

We hope to serve as a catalyst to promote positive public and private solutions to multi-faceted issues confronting Hispanic/Latino neighbors ensuring to document the resulting effects of action and inaction on our community.  We unreservedly oppose the decision of the Trump Administration to end DACA especially without a defined and humane path forward for our neighbors, friends, and family.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has studied and proposed common sense immigration reform for years and published detailed analysis to dispel myths, which are used for political advantage.  Opinions and false conclusions have been related as truths regarding “illegals” so we compiled a shortlist of facts for clarity.

Undocumented folks:
1. Do not receive free government healthcare.  Undocumented folks do not qualify for Medicaid or the Healthy Indiana Plan.

2. Do not take jobs that would be filled by citizens.  There is no correlation between high unemployment and immigration.  Findings indicate undocumented folks become entrepreneurs – create jobs – at twice the rate as U.S.-born folks.

3. Do pay taxes.  Taxes paid by undocumented folks proportionately to U.S.-born folks include property, excise, and sales tax.  Also federal, state and local income taxes, Social Security and Medicare taxes are automatically deducted from paychecks just like everyone else.  In 2013, undocumented folks contributed $11.6 billion in state and local taxes.

4.  Are not eligible tax-funded benefit programs.  Data from the Social Security Administration shows that in 2010 undocumented folks paid $13 billion in payroll taxes to Social Security and Medicare, benefits that are only accessible to citizens.

Additional findings by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce include:

– Immigrants do not drive down wages of U.S.-born workers.

–  Immigrants have economically revitalized many communities.

–  Immigrants do not cause crime rates to rise and are less likely to commit crime than U.S.-born individuals.

–  Mass deportation of undocumented immigrants would severely damage the U.S. economy.

Facts and statistics aside, we must remember that DACA recipients are human beings and members of our community.  DACA recipients have lived in the U.S. most of their lives – this is home.   DACA recipients have families, jobs, and contributors to our community.  To drive them away will not just damage our community as a whole but, at its base, it is cruel and inhumane.

Sincerely,
City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs

CHLA Letter to HT October 4 2017

Walmart’s C.E.O. Had Plenty to Say About Trump. So Did His Customers (in Bloomington, IN).

Since the violence in Charlottesville, chief executives across corporate America have had to weigh the risks of taking a stand against the administration. Mr. McMillon himself, while harshly rebuking the president, initially opted not to step down from the Strategic and Policy Forum before it disbanded — an example of the delicate balance that corporate leaders try to strike when dealing with Mr. Trump.

On Wednesday, we spoke with customers at Walmart stores in three communities — Las Vegas; Bloomington, Ind.; and Union Township, N.J.

This is what they had to say about Walmart chief executive’s decision to weigh into the political fray this week.

Latinos have been dying for America since before we were a nation.

The dominant narrative is that we have just “illegally” crossed the border or are “fresh off the boat.” In fact the Spanish are evidence of America’s first original sin: We were mistreating indigenous people here long before the British brought slaves to the colonies. People forget that Latinos founded some of America’s first cities.

Latinos have been dying for America since before we were a nation. Why have our children not heard that thousands of Latino patriots fought for America in the Revolutionary War? Bernardo de Gálvez, a Spanish general, recruited Mexicans, Cubans, Native Americans and free African-Americans to fight against the British in the South, while Cuban women donated their jewelry and money to help the patriots. Where is the Ken Burns documentary about that?

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Editorial: Lack of political diversity hurts Indiana

For 200 years, throughout the state’s entire history, no female, black or Latino leader has represented Indiana in the governor’s office or the U.S. Senate. And that history will not change this year — Democrats and Republicans have again nominated only white males for the state’s two most powerful, high-profile offices.

In fact, over the course of the past two centuries, only one woman (Democrat Jill Long Thompson for Senate in 1986 and governor in 2008) has even been nominated by the major parties for either office. Only one African-American (Republican Marvin Scott in 2004) has won a major party nomination for the U.S. Senate.

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Not Like Us

In fact, first-generation immigrants have a much lower crime rate than the overall population. As to the rapists claim, whites accounted for 71 percent of all sexual assaults in 2013, even though they are only 63 percent of the population, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Latinos, though 17 percent of the population, committed 9 percent of sex crimes.

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Open letter to Bloomington residents/Carta Abierta a los residentes de Bloomington

Open letter to Bloomington residents:

The Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs joins the Attorney General of Indiana, the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, the Indiana Farm Bureau, and civic leaders statewide in opposing Senate Bill 590 recently introduced by State Senator Delph and others. SB 590 seeks to divert local resources to the aggressive enforcement of federal immigration laws and to institute an English-only policy throughout public service, among other provisions.

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Indiana Town: From Racist Past to Primary Present

Both Democratic presidential contenders are in Indiana today. Polls show a tight contest there between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama less than a week before the primary.

In a moment we’ll hear how Barack Obama is managing the controversy over his former pastor. First though, to Indiana where the candidates are even looking for votes in rural Republican strongholds. On Sunday night Bill Clinton visited Martinsville, a town with a long record of electing Republicans and a troubled racial past.

Now, this week our co-host Michele Norris traveled to Martinsville too. She wanted to gauge how voters there view the historic presidential match-up between a woman and an African-American man.