Growing Marijuana Industry Struggles To Attract Employees Of Color

As marijuana becomes legal around the country, blacks and Latinos are often left out of new business opportunities. Advocates say people of color are often reluctant to join the growing legal marijuana economy because they were targeted far more often than whites during the war on drugs. Studies show members of such communities were arrested and jailed for illegal marijuana use far more often than whites.

As Massachusetts developed laws for legal marijuana, officials wrote what they claimed was a first-in-the-nation Social Equity Program explicitly to give members of those communities a leg up.

But this part of the state law isn’t working — next to no black or Latino candidates have applied for licenses in Massachusetts.

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IU Libraries celebrates Mexican

Students explored displays of Mexican art, history and immigration Thursday in Herman B Wells Library during the library’s Exploremos open house.

Exploremos was just one event put on as part of IU Arts and Humanities Council’s Mexico Remixed programming. The third annual remixed festival aims to celebrate the culture and history of a certain country each year through a series of events, activities and speakers, said Ed Comentale, director of the Arts and Humanities Council.

“It celebrates our international students, showcases our resources and knowledge in that area and explores current art and culture from that country,” Comentale said. “When we say remixed, we are referring to people who are actively remaking and rethinking the traditions of their country.”

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Brokaw suggested Latino immigrants’ kids don’t assimilate. That’s a myth!

Historians have noted that this is a tale as old as the United States itself. The very same critiques we hear now about Latino immigrants were once used to criticize large groups of immigrants who arrived from Europe. And over the past few decades, this kind of comment has been a regular refrain as part of arguments against immigration.
But for years, study after study has shown it simply isn’t true.
As Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography for the Pew Research Center, noted on Twitter, Latinos’ English proficiency has been on the rise for years. In fact, researchers have observed this for over a decade, he told CNN.

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Five myths about MS-13

The Trump administration’s campaign against immigration conflates the flow of undocumented immigrants from Central America with the growth of MS-13 – the brutal transnational street gang. The president and the attorney general frequently say that stopping the former means stopping the latter. Information about the four-decade-old gang, formally named Mara Salvatrucha, is scarce, but we know enough to dispel some of the misconceptions that have grown up around it.

Myth No. 1
MS-13 was created by Salvadoran ex-guerrillas.

The gang originated in Los Angeles, mostly in the areas of Korea Town, Pico Union and Westlake, in the early 1980s. It was formed by children of refugees

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Undocumented immigrants pay billions of dollars in federal taxes each year

One of the biggest misconceptions about undocumented immigrants is that they don’t pay any taxes. In his first address to Congress, President Trump set the tone for his coming immigration agenda when he said immigration costs US taxpayers “billions of dollars a year.”

A 2017 Gallup poll that asked survey respondents “whether immigrants to the United States are making the [tax] situation in the country better or worse” found that 41 percent said “worse,” while only 23 percent said “better” (33 percent said they had “no effect”).

The reality is far different. Immigrants who are authorized to work in the United States pay the same taxes as US citizens. And, contrary to the persistent myth, undocumented immigrants do in fact pay taxes too. Millions of undocumented immigrants file tax returns each year, and they are paying taxes for benefits they can’t even use.

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Standing up to fear

“I learned my lesson not to give up because I could have easily given up,” Naciye said as she recalled recovering from an assault by a former IU student in 2015. “I was almost losing my business.”

Naciye faced numerous hurdles in her recovery, including issues with her back and posture and the recent closing of the business, Sofra Café, due to unpaid taxes. Naciye said her physical therapist taught her to hold her spine straight again after the assault.

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Esther Fuentes: banker and Bloomington Latina activist

Fuentes, 43, now fulfills this aspiration as the Board President at El Centro Comunal Latino and the assistant manager at Old National Bank. Splitting her time between the two jobs is challenging, but she said they give her a sense of fulfillment. They incorporate her love for helping others, specifically the Latino community in Bloomington.

El Centro is a 15-year-old nonprofit that helps the Latino population in Bloomington. The organization offers health programs, translation, tutoring, youth mentoring, cultural competency training and cultural events.

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Does Immigration Hurt or Help Social Security?

Another factor that often gets a finger pointed at it by critics is immigration — more specifically, undocumented workers. Peruse social media and, among the fictitious claims that the government raided Social Security, you’re bound to find comments claiming that Social Security is being hurt by legal and illegal immigration into the United States.

But is this the case? Let’s have a closer look.

Undocumented workers, by law, can’t qualify for a Social Security number and therefore are ineligible for a retired worker benefit, as well as disability and survivor’s insurance protection. Unless migrants are on a legal path to citizenship and earning lifetime work credits, they won’t qualify for a benefit from either the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust or the Disability Insurance Trust.

However, this doesn’t mean undocumented workers aren’t contributing in some way to the Social Security program. According to AARP, approximately $12 billion in payroll tax revenue (from either the workers or their employers) was collected in 2010 from undocumented migrants.

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Video On Public Charge

Posted by Popp & Bullman, Attorneys-at-Law on Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Christie Popp
Popp & Bullman
Attorneys-at-Law
205 N. College Ave. Ste 615
Bloomington, Indiana 47404
(812) 323-3339
www.poppbullman.com

National Guardsman in Racist Wrigley Brawl

Ahmad Damra, a member of the Indiana National Guard, has been identified as the man who yelled “beaners” and “spics” at Hispanic people during a brawl in the bleachers of Wrigley Field. The brawl broke out following the Chicago Cubs 5-1 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 23. The game was promoted as “Hispanic Heritage Night” with the crowd being given t-shirts that read, “Los Cubs.” As security guards separating the brawling fans, a woman can be heard telling an official that the guards “will never know what it’s like.” The Chicago Tribune reports that local police were called to investigate the incident but no charges were filed.

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Immigration influx to Indiana

The candidates and their campaign advisers undoubtedly are stoking the anti-immigration fires because it’s proven effective in past practice or in polling. But if they want Indiana to grow and prosper, they should back off the fear-mongering. A new report from the Indiana Business Research Center suggests Indiana’s workforce will grow by only 34,000 between 2020 and 2050. The state’s economic future depends on its ability to attract young workers, including legal immigrants.

Matt Kinghorn, senior demographic analyst for the research center, notes the state’s labor force will record a “relatively healthy gain of 120,000 workers between 2010 and 2020” but will likely contract over the next decade as more baby boomers retire. Lower fertility rates affect the labor pool, as well. If rates had held steady to those recorded before the Great Recession, Indiana would see 70,000 more births than are expected in that decade-long span.

Migration is another factor, of course. Indiana saw its population and labor force declining through the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, but the trend was reversed with gains in net migration between 1990 and 2010. Hispanic residents moving into the state were responsible for 77 percent of the gain, according to data from the Applied Population Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin.

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Seventh Annual Indiana Latino Expo

As part of its efforts to build meaningful bridges with Latino communities, Indiana University will sponsor and host an exhibition booth at the 2018 Indiana Latino Expo. Held on Oct. 13 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, the Indiana Latino Expo will offer families and prospective students the opportunity to learn valuable information about the many educational opportunities available through IU.

The expo will take place in the Element Financial-Blue Ribbon Pavilion at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, and is free and open to all.

More information about IU’s presence at the 2018 Indiana Latino Expo, including details about the 21st Century Scholars Program, can be found at diversity.iu.edu.

Hoosiers need to know about the battle over immigration

The Trump administration has covered a lot of ground when it comes to immigration, often battling federal courts over actions taken to crack down on undocumented immigrants, restrict travel to and from predominantly Muslim countries and fighting in Congress for funding for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

A week into his presidency, Donald Trump announced a 90-day travel ban aimed at seven majority-Muslim countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — and a 120-day ban on refugees worldwide. That action was struck down by federal district and appeals courts. A second version of the ban was also struck down. In August, the Supreme Court upheld a third version of the ban that excluded Sudan and added Chad, North Korea and officials from Venezuela and made the ban indefinite instead of temporary.

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National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off Saturday

The farmer’s market will have an extra flair this Saturday as National Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off nearby with live dancing, Latin music, informational resources and more.

Bloomington has long celebrated the month to recognize the presence and contributions of Latino and Hispanic Americans, said Josefa Luce, Latino programs coordinator for the City of Bloomington.

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Military OneSource Is Now Available to Veterans and their Families for a Full Year After Separating from the Military

The Department of Defense announced today it will extend eligibility for Military OneSource benefits from the current 180 days to 365 days after separation or retirement from military service to ensure all service members and families have access to comprehensive support as they transition to civilian life. This change goes into effect today in accordance with the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2019.

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Hispanic-Owned Firms Packing Billion-Dollar Punch

INDIANAPOLIS – Hispanic-owned businesses in the Indianapolis area contribute more than $1 billion to the region’s economy, according to a new Indiana Business Research Center report. The study, commissioned by the Indy Chamber’s Hispanic Business Council, reports nearly 4,900 Hispanic-owned firms employing about 7,300 in the nine-county metro area.

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Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

Striker Ricardo Osuna, 17, who just graduated from Galax High and whose father is Mexican, says the Galax community is open and welcoming. But the opposing teams? Not so much.

“When we played, there was a bunch of racism,” he says. “Like, ‘Oh, wetbacks, get outta here!’ Once I got a yellow card, and they were like, ‘Hey ref, give him a green one, he probably needs it!’ Everybody was really mad about it.”

The Latino soccer players have powered the Galax team to four state championships in the last five years. The champion team is celebrated with a triumphant victory parade through town, escorted by fire trucks and police cars.

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Northern Indiana US courthouse flags honor late Judge Lozano

VALPARAISO, Ind. — Flags at federal courthouses in northern Indiana will fly at half-staff through Monday to honor late U.S. Senior Judge Rudy Lozano.

The court for the Northern District of Indiana announced Friday that the 76-year-old Lozano died Wednesday. A memorial Mass for Lozano will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Paul Catholic Church in Valparaiso.

President Ronald Reagan appointed Lozano, of East Chicago, the first Hispanic federal judge in Indiana in 1988. The court said he took senior status in July 2007 but continued to serve as a senior judge until his death.

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‘God Bless America’: 100 Years of an Immigrant’s Anthem

From this story, a classic piece of music emerged. The family, fleeing religious persecution in Russia in 1893, was soon reunited and allowed to enter the country. And that little boy, born Israel Beilin, would grow up to become Irving Berlin. Twenty-five years after emigrating, the same year he became an American citizen, he composed “God Bless America.”

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