Who Put The ‘Hispanic’ In Hispanic Heritage Month?

Hispanic Heritage Month is a nationally recognized, not-quite-a-month. (It’s the back half of September and the front half of October).

That, according to the government’s website, is because Sept. 15 marks the anniversary of Independence from Spain in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala and Costa Rica. (Mexico declared its independence a day later). And Oct. 12 is Día de la Raza, loosely translated as Day of the Race, or “Columbus Day” — a national holiday in a number of Latin American countries.

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Latino students at IU do not visit La Casa

Students reported reasons such as busy schedules and a lack of need or interest in participating with La Casa, which Martinez said she expected. But, what she did not expect was the 12.3 percent of students who said they felt unwelcome.

“After crunching the numbers, that’s about 250 Latino students that we might be missing out on because they don’t feel welcome,” she said. “To me, that’s significant enough.”

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Hundreds Stand In Solidarity With Charlottesville At Local Vigil

Hundreds of people gathered in front of the Monroe County courthouse Sunday night to stand in solidarity with Charlottesville, Va. and speak up against hate.

The vigil comes the day after white nationalists became violent in Charlottesville. Among the violence, a car drove into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one woman and injuring others.

At the Bloomington vigil, residents held signs with handwritten messages saying “love trumps hate” and “stop racism now.”

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First Thursday Festival

Source: https://artsandhumanities.indiana.edu/council-initiatives/first-thursdays/index.html

What: First Thursday festival

When: Thursday, March 2nd, from 5:00 to 7:30 PM

Where: Arts Plaza in front of the IU Auditorium.

It should be a nice spring evening to take a break from work or studies and enjoy the campus and its creative community.

We started this tradition last fall with dozens of student and faculty performers and thousands of guests from campus and the wider Bloomington community. We are excited to kick off the spring season this week with a celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring dozens of IU’s fabulous women artists and scholars and many local and international performances and exhibits. The festival is free and open to the whole Bloomington community.

Some highlights include:

Main Stage: We’ll kick off the evening with The Vallures, a crowd-pleasing singing and dancing group from Bloomington that performs a mix of classic 60s hits and original tracks. Up next is Ladies First, IU’s very own award-winning a cappella group. Lily & Madeleine, the nationally acclaimed indie folk duo from Indianapolis, will round out the set with their warm and uplifting harmonies.

Acclaimed Novelist Ha Jin: Ha Jin’s work explores the tensions between the individual and the family, the modern and the traditional, and personal feelings and duty. His novel, Waiting, won the National Book Award for fiction in 1999, as well as the PEN/Faulkner award. He also wrote the story collection The Bridegroom, which won the Asian American Literary Award, and two collections of poetry. He will be speaking at the Grunwald Gallery at 8:00.

Eskenazi Museum of Art and the Lilly Library: Step inside the Eskenazi for new tours, games, and scavenger hunts. Stop by the African Student Association’s booth for Nigerian Face Painting, experience the art of henna with the Indian Student Association, or examine the critical relationship between women and the arts during a special lecture by Tavy D. Aherne. The Lilly Library is celebrating women collectors and their treasures with an impressive and rarely exhibited display of children’s literature and a collection of over 16,000 miniature books.

World music and Bloomington bands: Tour the world of music with Kaia, an award-winning, Bloomington-based band of seven women performing in over 25 languages. Enjoy Finnish folksongs, African-American gospel, and a thrilling array of other musical styles. Next, ExWo (Explosive Women) takes over. Another local group, ExWo combines jazz, pop, funk, and neo-soul to create an exciting blend of original songs and reimagined classic hits.

Plenty of good food! Grab a blanket and eat dinner around Showalter Fountain. Chef David Tallent has prepared a tribute to famous female cooks and chefs such as Edna Lewis, Elizabeth Davis, and Alice Waters. The delicious menu options include southern fried chicken, chocolate mousse, and goat cheese crouton. As always, we’ll also be giving out free popcorn!

Crafts, trivia, history, and games: Visit the Toast Tent for an edible craft, or work with Collins students to turn your own body into geometric shapes. Recreate famous paintings with props and photographs from the faculty and students of the Art History department. Or stop by the Mathers Museum tent to welcome spring with flower making and other hands-on activities. Delve into Hoosier HERStory!, an exhibition honoring two hundred years of women’s contributions to IU history and culture. Visit the Feminist Student Association for engaging conversations on the contributions that black women have made to social justice

The First Thursdays festival offers great opportunities for you to explore the breadth of the arts and humanities on campus and in the community. It’s an easy-going community event where you can enjoy dinner on the lawn by our Acoustic Tent, explore stunning exhibits at the Grunwald and Lilly, or dash from tent to tent to discover everything there is to offer. Whatever you choose, we invite you to celebrate Women’s History Month and the amazing creativity of the IU community with us this Thursday.

To learn more about our performers and events, check out our website at go.iu.edu/first-thursdays. If you’re interested in performing at a future event, write to us at ahcounc@indiana.edu. We’re always happy to support both professional and amateur artists, whether your talent is music or magic tricks. And be sure to follow us on Twitter for updates on First Thursdays and all Arts & Humanities Council news.

An Evening in Celebration of Mexico and the Latin American Diaspora Concert – Folk Music * Poetry * Classical Music Popular Music * Dancing

January 20; 6pm at the Unitarian Universalist Church (2120 North Fee Lane, Bloomington)

One World, One Bloomington: An Evening in Celebration of Mexico and the Latin American Diaspora focuses on our diverse, ever united community. This event will feature folk music, poetry readings, classical music, popular music and dancing from the heart of the Latin American tradition, encouraging solidarity and community. An Evening in Celebration of Mexico and the Latin American Diaspora will feature some of the best musicians from Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music, as well as members of the community at large. Speakers will share their personal stories, highlighting the immigrant experience—each tale as unique as a fingerprint. Come out, and listen, smile, dance, share and celebrate Latino community! This event is free and open to the general public. For more information, contact Alejandra Martinez at am250@indiana.edu.

Student presents findings on Latino Urban revolts

“Chicago treated Puerto Ricans as model minorities,” Fountain said.

This notion of being a model minority was persistent across the United States and caused a lot of unrest among Puerto Rican communities, he said. 

After many Puerto Rican riots the perceptions surrounding them as a minority have changed, he said. Prior to the riots in the 1970’s, Puerto Ricans were considered a model minority, whereas after they were seen as being no different from African-Americans at the time, Fountain said. 

“What you see throughout these riots are feelings of invisibility,” Fountain said in his presentation.

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The ‘Obama Effect’ And Latino Identity

Last month, we told you that the Code Switch team is embarking on a big reporting project we’re calling The Obama Effect. The series, coinciding with the final year of Barack Obama’s administration, will explore the ways that his presidency has (or hasn’t) altered how Americans talk and think about race, ethnicity and identity.

Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll be narrowing in on how this story plays out within the Latino community — or communities, rather. How has the idea of Latino identity evolved over the past eight years, in light of America’s first non-white president, the frustrated push for immigration reform and the simple fact that the U.S. is becoming increasingly brown?

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INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL BREAKS OUT TRUMP FATHEADS TO TAUNT LATINO OPPONENTS

Andrean High School is a Catholic school in northern Indiana whose motto is “Christ Is Our Teacher.” But Jesus has some explaining to do today — how did he let this get through?

In its boys basketball game against Bishop Noll Institute on Friday, the Andrean rooting section went full Donald Trump — holding up fatheads of The Donald, chanting “Build a wall!” and making other racial references. Bishop Noll is primarily Latino.

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Hola Bloomington Julio 10, 2015

Los locutores de HOLA Bloomington Carlos Bakota y Araceli Gómez-Aldana entrevistan dos agentes de la policía estatal, Capitán Ruben Marte y Sgt. Curt Durnil. Los agentes hablan sobre asuntos policiales y consejos sobre qué hacer si eres detenido por un oficial de policía.
Hola Bloomington’s hosts Carlos Bakota and Araceli Gómez-Aldana interview Indiana State Troopers, Captain Ruben Marte and Sgt. Curt Durnil. They talk about important police matters and what to do if you are stopped by a police officer.

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