Walmart’s C.E.O. Had Plenty to Say About Trump. So Did His Customers (in Bloomington, IN).

Since the violence in Charlottesville, chief executives across corporate America have had to weigh the risks of taking a stand against the administration. Mr. McMillon himself, while harshly rebuking the president, initially opted not to step down from the Strategic and Policy Forum before it disbanded — an example of the delicate balance that corporate leaders try to strike when dealing with Mr. Trump.

On Wednesday, we spoke with customers at Walmart stores in three communities — Las Vegas; Bloomington, Ind.; and Union Township, N.J.

This is what they had to say about Walmart chief executive’s decision to weigh into the political fray this week.

Why are people still racist?

“The only way to change bias is to change culture,” Richeson said. “You have to change what is acceptable in society. People today complain about politically correct culture, but what that does is provide a check on people’s outward attitude, which in turn influences how we think about ourselves internally. Everything we’re exposed to gives us messages about who is good and bad.”

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Hundreds Stand In Solidarity With Charlottesville At Local Vigil

Hundreds of people gathered in front of the Monroe County courthouse Sunday night to stand in solidarity with Charlottesville, Va. and speak up against hate.

The vigil comes the day after white nationalists became violent in Charlottesville. Among the violence, a car drove into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one woman and injuring others.

At the Bloomington vigil, residents held signs with handwritten messages saying “love trumps hate” and “stop racism now.”

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Indianapolis looks to end compliance with immigration detainer requests

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office plans to drastically reduce its compliance with federal immigration detainer requests.

On Monday, attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and the city of Indianapolis filed a stipulated judgment (or settlement) and injunction to end the practice of holding people in jail without probable cause on behalf of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The agreement is expected to be signed by U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Barker.

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At Least 18 Lynchings Took Place In Indiana By 1940

A national nonprofit organization says at least 18 lynchings took place in Indiana between 1880 and 1940, as part of more than 300 lynchings in eight states outside the deep south during that time.

The Equal Justice Initiative released a new report Tuesday outlining the history of racial terror lynchings in the United States.

“Racial terror lynchings were horrific acts of targeted violence against African Americans…by white mobs who murdered black people with no risk of accountability or punishment,” the report says.

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‘Kate’s Law’ battle shifts to the Senate, testing Dems

The fight over immigration enforcement is moving to the Senate, where Democratic opposition will be tested.

The House passed a pair of immigration bills late last week: “Kate’s Law” to increase maximum penalties for criminal aliens who attempt to re-enter the country, and a second bill cutting funding to cities that refuse to comply with federal immigration laws.

Republicans got an unexpected boost when two-dozen House Democrats voted for “Kate’s Law,” viewed by GOP supporters as a first step toward implementing President Trump’s campaign promises on immigration.

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Hispanic, Asian numbers increase

Despite anti-immigration rhetoric surrounding political campaigns, Indiana’s Hispanic population continues to grow, though not as fast as in past years.

And while its numbers are still relatively small, the Asian population continues to be the fastest-growing ethnic group in the state and nation, according to recently released census population estimates.

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Asylee vs. Refugee: Application & Procedural Differences

The difference between asylees and refugees is largely procedural. A person who requests asylum in the United States is called an asylee. A person who requests protection while still overseas, and then is given permission to enter the U.S. as a refugee, is naturally called a refugee.

However, here is the likely source of confusion in this area. Both types of applicants must, in order to obtain their status, prove the same thing — that they qualify for protection under U.S. law, because they meet the definition of a refugee found in Section 101(a)(42)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (I.N.A.).

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Continuing School Segregation in Indiana

Segregation between white students and students of color in Indiana remains high, according to a new analysis from Indiana University.

This is true even as Indiana sees a growing share of non-white students. IU’s Center for Evaluation and Education Policy conducted the study along with the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

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“It is important for Hoosiers to recognize that research shows that segregated schools are systematically unequal,” said Gary Orfield, UCLA professor and co-director of the Civil Rights Project. “History shows that Indiana did much more about this problem before the courts withdrew and needs to think again about positive strategies.”

The most decorated US WWI veteran from Texas was actually a Mexican immigrant

On April 26, 1896, in Chihuahua, Mexico, Marcelino Serna was born into a very poor family.  He left home at the age of twenty, and crossed the border into the United States, traveling to El Paso, Texas to find a job and improve his life.  Since he didn’t speak English, he had to take low-paying jobs and was soon working in Denver, Colorado on a sugar beet farm.

When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, Serna was in Denver working with a group of men who were picked up by federal officers checking the draft status of potential soldiers.  To prevent his deportation to Mexico, Serna volunteered to join the Army.

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These robotics students were told ‘to go back to Mexico.’

Just a few months ago, not many knew about these five fourth-graders from a low-income community in Indianapolis.

But now, the Panther Bots, a thriving robotics team at Pleasant Run Elementary School, have become the face of a success story about a group of kids who were taunted with racial slurs but were too determined to let that affect their confidence. Earlier this month, they found themselves being honored on the Senate floor of the Indiana Statehouse. The group travels to Louisville on Sunday to compete in a worldwide robotics contest.

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Immigration Witnesses

Dear People of Good Will,

A new group called Immigration Witnesses is working on a plan to help support immigrants at risk for deportation at this time of acute anti-immigrant rhetoric & action at the federal level which reaches into each state, county, and town.  We are inviting local community members to become involved.

There are three ways community members can help:

1. Accompaniment of a person or family
This means that the accompanier will be given the names of 5 immigrant people, and the 5 immigrant people will receive the accompanier’s phone number.  The immigrant will call when afraid of being detained and if and when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers arrive for that purpose.  Accompaniers will be trained by lawyers about what they can do and say when they are with the immigrant and ICE.

2. Holding important documents
This means that the support person will keep copies of Power of Attorney and Guardianship papers so that if the immigrant is detained, the papers can be taken to the person who has the POA and/or Guardian.

3. Documenting and communicating with the media
Individuals who are doing accompaniment will be making videos of interactions on the street or when ICE comes.  The people who take on this role will be witnesses about what has happened.  They will be asked to write letters to the editor and/or post the videos online.

Contact “El Centro” or “City of Bloomington Latino Outreach”

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Latin American Consulates

Argentina
205 N. Michigan Ave, Suite 4208/09, Chicago, IL 60601
(312) 819-2610           www.cchic.mrecic.gov.ar

Belize
2535 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20008-2826
(202) 332-9636           www.embassyofbelize.org

Bolivia
1825 Connecticut Avenue N.W. Suite 200C, Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 232-4827           www.boliviawdc.org

Brazil
401 North Michigan Ave., Suite 1850, Chicago, IL 60611-4207
(312) 464-0244           http://chicago.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/

Chile
875 North Michigan Ave. Suite 3352, Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 654-8780           http://chile.gob.cl/chicago/en/

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District 10 Pro Bono Project provides free legal services

District 10 Pro Bono Project provides free legal services in Clay, Greene, Hendricks, Lawrence, Monroe, Morgan, Owen, and Putnam, Indiana. We do so with a number of innovative programs matching volunteer attorneys with clients who need help with shelter, income, safety, or access to justice.

The District 10 Pro Bono Project provides legal services to indigent people who otherwise would not be able to obtain justice. We do so by recruiting, training and recognizing attorneys from the private bar, and helping these attorneys fulfill their pro bono obligations. We support lawyers in their natural role as problem solvers, so that lawyers can help lower income people create permanent solutions to issues involving shelter, income, safety, civil liberties, access to justice, and other necessities of life. Our volunteers include judges, lawyers, professors, law students and other community members, all of whom work together to create better justice in our legal system and better lives for the people in our community.

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What is Sanctuary Everywhere?

“Sanctuary Everywhere” is the simple idea that everyday people can work to keep each other safe—wherever we are. Sanctuary can mean taking someone into a congregation to protect them, but even broader than that, sanctuary is about the community coming together to protect those who need it.

That means standing up to discrimination, harassment, and violence in our schools, congregations, public spaces, cities, streets, and everywhere it happens. Whether we are welcoming refugees or working to stop deportations, protecting religious groups who have been targeted and attacked, working to ensure that Black Lives Matter by interrupting anti-Black violence, or protecting the rights of LGBTQ people, we are all in this together.

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Bicultural students analyze Latino population

Bicultural students will hone research skills and study civic resilience of North-Central Indiana’s Latino communities this summer by analyzing data collected from surveys they create and distribute.

The students will travel to Fort Wayne, Frankfurt and other regions in Indiana beyond Tippecanoe County as part of a joint university operation between Ivy Tech Lafayette and Purdue University in a class titled “Latino Immigrants in the Crossroad of America.” The course will be led by Jay McCann, a Purdue professor of political science, and Randy Triplett, an Ivy Tech professor of political science.

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CLDC workshop focuses on community engagement

Seven people spoke about their fears in the current political climate and the future and discussed ways to be involved in community and create change even in the face of discrimination Thursday evening.

Members of the Community and Leadership Development Center led activities and discussions of community engagement during their program “Together We Rise” at La Casa Latino Cultural Center.

“It’s important to remind students that they have the power to engage and participate in democracy,” CLDC graduate assistant Alyssa Beauchamp said.

This program has occurred two times before, once with staff at the CLDC and once at the Indiana Latino Leadership Conference. Director of La Casa Lillian Casillas asked the CLDC if they could bring the program to La Casa.

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Partnership Aims to Tackle Diabetes Among Latinos

INDIANAPOLIS –

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly & Co. (NYSE: LLY) has announced a research collaboration with the William Sansum Diabetes Center in California. The pharmaceutical company says the partnership aims to improve the lives of Latino people affected by diabetes.

Lilly says the collaboration will provide insight into the unmet needs of Latino diabetes patients and help with the development of interventions that could improve health outcomes.

“This is a great opportunity for us to further understand the significant impact of diabetes for Latino families,” said Dara Schuster, senior director of U.S. Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes. “Through this collaboration, we will learn where the gaps are so we can develop meaningful solutions for the unmet needs.”

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Army Vet Who Served Two Tours In Afghanistan To Be Deported

A Chicago immigration judge ruled last week that an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan be deported back to Mexico, according to a local ABC affiliate.

The decision comes after Miguel Perez Jr. served seven years in prison for a felony drug offense. Perez, 38, was born in Mexico but has lived in the United States since the age of 8. He enlisted in the Army as a legal permanent resident in 2001 and served two tours in Afghanistan with U.S. Special Forces.

“My son served for this country, not for Mexico,” Perez’s mother, Esperanza Medina, told reporters at a Pilsen church on Sunday. 

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Illegal Immigration Doesn’t Always Match Reality

When you think of illegal immigration in the U.S., do you picture a border crosser or a visa overstayer? A family or a single person? A farmworker or a waiter?

People living in the U.S. without legal status are frequently invoked in American politics especially in recent months. But the conversation is often short on facts about the millions of people who fall into this category.

There are, however, outdated beliefs: A Pew Research Center survey in 2015 found that very few Americans are aware of recent changes in immigration patterns.

For example, the top 10 countries for visa overstays in FY 2015: #1. Canada (~93,000), #2. Mexico (~42,000)…

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Crowdsourcing Dataset Map of ICE Raids

Alternative journalism, and humor social commentary digital platform Latino Rebels launched a new crowdsourcing data campaign called MIGRAMAP that tracks and maps ICE raids. The new initiative allows everyone to pinpoint the location of these raids.

MIGRAMAP is a data tool, a social media platform and a global positioning system, all in one. The community reports the location immigration officers are raiding. The website will show a color-coded map with the data results. The tool is based on self-reports. It has the option for the community to post their own stories.

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San Jose, CA an immigration success story

Q: What have the waves of immigration meant for San Jose?

A: In Silicon Valley diversity and our immigrant community has been the secret sauce to our success. About half of our venture-funded start-ups are started by foreign born entrepreneurs. Obviously we have our share of challenges. But there’s an incredible story to tell about what immigration has brought to our community. I hope the rest of the nation will take heed.

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