Small Indiana City Feels Aftermath Of Hurricane Maria

Warsaw-based Zimmer Biomet is located about 29 miles west of Columbia City. They also have a plant in Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria, Zimmer asked some of their Puerto Rican employees if they would relocate to plants in the continental U.S., like the one in Warsaw.

Local officials helped welcome the new residents but Columbia City Mayor Ryan Daniel had some concerns. When he heard the news, he worried about housing and whether the new residents would feel welcomed.

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Group hopes to break barriers for Latino community

On the adults’ end, Rivas said, it’s not that they don’t want to learn English, but rather that classes don’t line up with their work schedules and family obligations. In a lot of cases, Rivas said, the adults know some English, but hesitate to use it in formal situations out of fear of being judged or misunderstood.

The discussions also showed a perception among Anglos that Latinos don’t value education or work promotions as much as Anglos. Rivas said that’s not the case. Rather, the issue is that Latino parents don’t understand the U.S. education system, having not grown up with it, and the language barrier can make it difficult to learn about it. For promotions, Latino workers would like to be promoted, but are often hesitant because of Latino cultural norms. Latino families, for example, value keeping the family together above personal success. That can lead younger Latinos to turn down promotions that could elevate their status above someone else in their family or necessitate a move.

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The Most Inclusive U.S. Cities, Mapped

One of their top-line findings: The ten cities faring the best on the inclusion metrics in 2013 were also flourishing economically. “There is a strong relationship between the economic health of a city and a city’s ability to support inclusion for its residents,” the authors write in the report.

In a time of widening inequality, the findings of this report provide a roadmap for a deliberate effort to mitigate the forces that have created unequal communities. The authors conclude:

As this research illustrates, not all cities have made intentional progress, and, for some cities, economic conditions changed and prosperity was more widely shared. However, sustaining this progress toward more shared prosperity requires intentional effort, transparency, and policies.

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IU students raise thousands to help favorite C-Store cashier’s daughter

Being a cashier at the C-Store in Indiana University Bloomington’s McNutt Quadrangle can be stressful. But Residential Programs and Services Dining employee Oscar Arreaza has a simple strategy for keeping his cool: He has fun.

“I have seen many cashiers over the years stressing themselves out,” Arreaza said. “What I do to avoid stressing is I always have a good time.”

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IU offers help to Puerto Rican graduate students

When news of Hurricane Maria hit IU, several members of the School of Education decided they wanted to do something to help.

The result became the IU Bloomington-Universidad de Puerto Rico Education Graduate Scholars program. This partnership created space for six graduate education students from the University of Puerto Rico to come work and study at IU-Bloomington.

Two of the main people driving this initiative are Professor Bradley Levinson and Associate Professor Carmen Medina from the School of Education.

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Black and Brown Arts Festival

Below you will find the link for you to sign up to be a participant at the inaugural Black and Brown Arts Fest.  Please remember art will be reviewed by an independent jury.  There is a $15 non-refundable fee for your provided space.
If you are under the age of 18, there may be scholarships available to you through our corporate sponsors.  If you would like more information regarding this, please contact me via email: gavineverett@gmail.com
We are very excited to have you involved with this great event.
Whether they wish to participate or spectate, the more people that show up, the more successful we will all be.
Sign up:
Thank you for being a part of the first ever Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Fest.  We look forward to seeing you all in May!

 

Indiana’s Working Families More Likely To Be Poor, Have Lower Incomes Than Midwestern Neighbors

(INDIANAPOLIS) – New data finds Indiana has the 19th-highest rate of working families who are low income (11th-highest among racial/ethnic minority families) but also 16th-lowest incomes.

Andrew Bradley, Senior Policy Analyst with Indiana Institute for Working Families, says work should not only be honorable and bring dignity, but should also pay for a family’s basic needs and provide opportunities to continue on a pathway to long-term economic security.

But new data shows that a higher proportion of Indiana’s working families remain low-income compared to our Midwestern neighbors, particularly Hoosiers of color. Indiana’s per capita income also trails most neighbors, with income growth that lags behind the national average suggesting that without a new policy direction, working Hoosier families aren’t likely to catch up soon.

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El Paso Mayor On National Guard Mexican Border Deployments

DEE MARGO: El Paso is one region of three states and two countries and a population of 2.7 million. But we’ve been involved with Mexico for over 400 years. So we’re pretty close and proximate here. We haven’t had – we’re considered the safest city in the United States. We don’t have any real issues. And we already have a fence that was established under the Bush administration that runs through our city, so…

 

 

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Submissions sought for inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival

Artists and performers of color are being sought for the inaugural Bloomington Black and Brown Arts Festival in May.

“The Bloomington Black & Brown Arts Festival is a celebration of African and Latino creative arts and artists to affirm community space, preserve arts appreciation, and enhance pride in the spirit of diversity of the Bloomington community,” according to a city press release. “The festival will provide a medium for local talent to showcase visual and performance art in an environment that engages the audience with artists and their work.”

The festival will take place on Saturday May 19 at the Bannerker Community Center from noon to 4 p.m.

Interested artists/performers have until Friday, April 27 at 5:30 p.m. to submit their pieces or work for a panel review that will take place on Saturday, May 5. Artists/performers selected will also be asked to submit a $15 non-refundable fee to reserve space.

A planning committee seeks a variety of art styles and forms to include as part of the festival. This includes but is not limited to spoken word, visual arts, ceramics, performance, dance and craft.

Works can be submitted on the web at bloomington.in.gov/bhm. For more information or questions about the festival contact the Safe and Civil City Program at safeandcivil@bloomington.in.gov, Latino Outreach Programs at latinoprograms@bloomington.in.gov, or call 812-349-3860.

This article originally ran on blogs.hoosiertimes.com.

A US vet facing deportation

A US Army veteran who served two tours in Afghanistan says he didn’t realize he’d been deported to Mexico until it was too late to turn back.

Speaking from Tijuana Monday, Miguel Perez told reporters that he’s feeling well physically, but is “very confused.”
Perez was escorted across the US-Mexico border from Texas and handed over to Mexican authorities Friday, ICE said in a statement. Perez says a truck took him to an airport in Indiana. He was then flown to Brownsville, Texas, ICE said.

Indiana Health Rankings Report

“Black and Hispanic children in Indiana are doing worse than white and Asian children,” said Willems Van Dijk.

In Indiana, Hamilton County near Indianapolis ranked as the healthiest county. The county placed first in health outcomes, which included length and quality of life statistics. Hamilton was also the best in health factors, including health behaviors, clinical care access, social and economic factors, and physical environment.

QUEER ALIENation

QUEER ALIENation is a free, interactive evening of visual art, installation art, performances, conversation, and community solidarity. Join six local scholars, artists, educators, and activists as they play with issues of time, space, equity, and identity in order to present original artworks about their experiences as queer im/migrant graduate students with​in the United States. Grounded in arts-based research and rooted in a conception of art as activism, this show is a clarion call for individual and collective commitments to justice, mutual aid, and liberation.

Featuring the work of:
Javier Cardona Otero
Daniela Gutiérrez López
Asja Žero
Marie Papineschi (Marie French)
Don Dumayas
Kelvin Burzon
with original research by Alexandria Hollett and in collaboration with The Back Door.

March 27, 2018 from 6pm to 10pm, Dance Party at 10pm:
Cruise the room from 6 – 8 PM,

ask questions during the panel discussion from 8 – 9 PM,

and be fabulous on the dance floor when we turn the disco lights on from 10 – 3 AM. Most importantly, though, show up for queer im/migrants and their lives from now – as long as it takes to build a queer future, without borders.

https://www.facebook.com/events/2064458157166120/

What is Puerto Rico?” A state? A territory? A commonwealth?

Almost everyone can remember the video of President Donald Trump throwing rolls of paper towels to the people of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

“People were aghast,” said Dr. Luis Fuentes-Rohwer. “To me, that’s just the way it’s always been. You, the American public, just happened to see it then.”

Fuentes-Rohwer, a native of Puerto Rico and current professor at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, was one of the keynote speakers at the 19th Annual Indiana Latino Leadership Conference held at Indiana University Kokomo on Saturday.

 [more]

National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC)

En Español

The National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) offers a wide range of legal services to low-income immigrants. Attorneys and trained staff provide consultations and legal representation on the following matters:

Deferred Action for Eligible Youth (DACA)
Legal assistance for eligible youth and their families seeking to apply for deferred action and employment authorization.

Family-based immigration
Legal assistance for permanent residents and U.S. citizens who want to apply to bring family members to the United States or to allow family members in the United States to adjust their status.

Applications for Lawful Permanent Residence
Assistance in completing and filing applications for lawful permanent residence (also known as a green card.

Naturalization/Citizenship
Legal assistance for permanent residents who want to apply to become U.S. citizens.

Temporary Protected Status (TPS)
Legal assistance for immigrants who qualify for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) visas based on their country of origin and dates of immigration.

Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act (NACARA)
Assistance in completing and filing applications for Nicaraguan, Cuban, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan immigrants and nationals of the former Soviet Union who entered the United States in the 1990s.

Removal/deportation defense
Legal representation for immigrants who are in deportation proceedings.

Legal protections for immigrant victims of family violence
Legal assistance for men and women who qualify for immigration benefits under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) because they have been abused by a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Visas for immigrant victims of crimes
Assistance in obtaining a visa for immigrants who have been a victim of a crime and are willing to assist law enforcement in the investigation of that crime.

Visas for immigrant victims of human trafficking
Assistance in obtaining a visa for immigrants who have been trafficked into the United States.

VenBloomington

VenBloomington es una lista privada donde Venezolanos en Bloomington, IN pueden compartir ideas, hacer preguntas, listar recursos, o simplemente publicitar eventos a al resto de los integrantes de la lista. En estos momentos difíciles, es obvio que la primera necesidad es ayudar a nuestros mas recientes inmigrantes; pero también creemos que podemos servir como apoyo emocional y cultural.

Para mas información y como inscribirte, visita la pagina: https://groups.google.com/d/forum/venbloomington

Sueños pausados

Aquel martes comenzó como cualquier otro.  María Chávez Juárez estaba sentada en su clase de criminología, Sandy Rivera estaba en astronomía y Kemberly Hernández estaba en el Campus Center de IUPUI. Muy pronto el celular de María, que estaba entre sus piernas, empezó a vibrar con cada mensaje que recibía.

Ella empezó a mirar los mensajes de Snapchat olvidándose de escuchar a su profesor. El Presidente de los Estados Unidos había enviado un mensaje de Twitter al mundo:

“Congreso, alístese a hacer su trabajo – DACA!”

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Trump Uses MS-13 To “Sell Draconian Overhauls Of Border Issues”

MS-13, for him, solves all kinds of rhetorical problems. So first of all, he wants to portray immigrants nationwide as being criminals. And that’s obviously empirically untrue. But also statistically, that’s wildly inaccurate. Crime in immigrant communities tends to be much lower. Immigrants tend to be much more law abiding than citizens.

It helps him shape the debate on DREAMers and recipients of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which is kind of a big congressional issue now ever since Trump canceled the program in September of 2017. He often mentions the two in the same sentence as a way of trying to sell wholesale draconian overhauls of border security measures and interior enforcement measures. MS-13 is useful for him there.

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Graduate seeks to help reduce infant mortality rate

Fresh out of college with her health sciences degree, Andrea Zepeda is urging mothers to think inside the Baby Box, as a community health doula for Community Wellness Partners in Cass County.

“Not having a safe place to sleep can be fatal for an infant,” said Zepeda, who graduated in December from Indiana University Kokomo. “The box has a padded mat in it, and nothing else, so the baby sleeps in the safest possible environment, and has one less risk factor.”

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We Locked Four Experts in a Room Until They Solved Immigration

Over 120 minutes, we learned a lot about the contours of the current immigration debate—what both sides really care about (and if it’s actually Trump’s wall) and whether, somewhere out there, there is a deal that just might be palatable to advocates who like immigration and to those who want less of it. The answer is, actually yes. No question, the results were surprising. Congress, are you listening?

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Building A Latino-Muslim Coalition With #TacoTrucksAtEveryMosque

The connection between Middle Eastern and Mexican food goes all the way back to the Moors, and is well-known in culinary circles. Al pastor tacos are just a pork version of the shawarma spits that Lebanese immigrants brought with them to Mexico City in the 1930s. In nearby Puebla, a wrap called tacos árabes — Arabic tacos — uses a flatbread that’s halfway between pita and lavash. Kibbe (fried meatballs made from bulghur wheat) is popular in the Yucatán, thanks to Syrians who settled in the Peninsula over the past century. And the Lebanese-Mexican Chedraui family of Mexico City owns one of the largest Latino supermarket chains in the United States, El Super.

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Hurricane Maria Assistance Program

As Puerto Rico continues to rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, Indiana University is offering qualified undergraduate students who are currently enrolled in accredited Puerto Rican colleges and universities the opportunity to spend the Spring 2018 semester at any IU campus. Find information for Puerto Rican students interested in a visiting semester at IU and information for IU faculty who would like to sponsor these students.

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

“Our founding documents were all published in German to accommodate the German-speaking populations. For most of the 19th century, instruction in public schools across the country – from Pennsylvania to Texas to Wisconsin – occurred entirely in languages other than English, or bilingually. And this practice was not abolished until the first decades of the 20th century.”

Nor did immigrants of that era classify themselves as legal or illegal.

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Latino Civil Rights Leader Speaks Out About Trump’s Immigration Framework

This week, the head of the country’s oldest Latino civil rights organization took a surprising position. We are talking about Roger Rocha. He’s president of LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens. On Sunday, he endorsed White House principles for an immigration deal in a letter of thanks to President Trump. Those principles include border security, ending the visa lottery, cutting back on family reunification along with DACA, legalizing people who were brought over the border as young children. Rocha withdrew his letter after an outpouring of criticism and calls for him to resign.

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Company scraps plan for Indiana immigrant detention center

Goshen Mayor Jeremy Stutsman, wrote a letter opposing the construction of the detention center and gained a number of co-signers from the business community, was pleased with CoreCivic’s decision.

“(I’m) obviously pretty happy they decided to move on and very grateful for the amount of community members, businesses leaders and elected officials for their work to benefit our county,” Stutsman said.

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