Hispanic, Asian numbers increase

Despite anti-immigration rhetoric surrounding political campaigns, Indiana’s Hispanic population continues to grow, though not as fast as in past years.

And while its numbers are still relatively small, the Asian population continues to be the fastest-growing ethnic group in the state and nation, according to recently released census population estimates.

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Asylee vs. Refugee: Application & Procedural Differences

The difference between asylees and refugees is largely procedural. A person who requests asylum in the United States is called an asylee. A person who requests protection while still overseas, and then is given permission to enter the U.S. as a refugee, is naturally called a refugee.

However, here is the likely source of confusion in this area. Both types of applicants must, in order to obtain their status, prove the same thing — that they qualify for protection under U.S. law, because they meet the definition of a refugee found in Section 101(a)(42)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (I.N.A.).

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Continuing School Segregation in Indiana

Segregation between white students and students of color in Indiana remains high, according to a new analysis from Indiana University.

This is true even as Indiana sees a growing share of non-white students. IU’s Center for Evaluation and Education Policy conducted the study along with the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

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“It is important for Hoosiers to recognize that research shows that segregated schools are systematically unequal,” said Gary Orfield, UCLA professor and co-director of the Civil Rights Project. “History shows that Indiana did much more about this problem before the courts withdrew and needs to think again about positive strategies.”

The most decorated US WWI veteran from Texas was actually a Mexican immigrant

On April 26, 1896, in Chihuahua, Mexico, Marcelino Serna was born into a very poor family.  He left home at the age of twenty, and crossed the border into the United States, traveling to El Paso, Texas to find a job and improve his life.  Since he didn’t speak English, he had to take low-paying jobs and was soon working in Denver, Colorado on a sugar beet farm.

When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, Serna was in Denver working with a group of men who were picked up by federal officers checking the draft status of potential soldiers.  To prevent his deportation to Mexico, Serna volunteered to join the Army.

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These robotics students were told ‘to go back to Mexico.’

Just a few months ago, not many knew about these five fourth-graders from a low-income community in Indianapolis.

But now, the Panther Bots, a thriving robotics team at Pleasant Run Elementary School, have become the face of a success story about a group of kids who were taunted with racial slurs but were too determined to let that affect their confidence. Earlier this month, they found themselves being honored on the Senate floor of the Indiana Statehouse. The group travels to Louisville on Sunday to compete in a worldwide robotics contest.

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Immigration Witnesses

Dear People of Good Will,

A new group called Immigration Witnesses is working on a plan to help support immigrants at risk for deportation at this time of acute anti-immigrant rhetoric & action at the federal level which reaches into each state, county, and town.  We are inviting local community members to become involved.

There are three ways community members can help:

1. Accompaniment of a person or family
This means that the accompanier will be given the names of 5 immigrant people, and the 5 immigrant people will receive the accompanier’s phone number.  The immigrant will call when afraid of being detained and if and when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers arrive for that purpose.  Accompaniers will be trained by lawyers about what they can do and say when they are with the immigrant and ICE.

2. Holding important documents
This means that the support person will keep copies of Power of Attorney and Guardianship papers so that if the immigrant is detained, the papers can be taken to the person who has the POA and/or Guardian.

3. Documenting and communicating with the media
Individuals who are doing accompaniment will be making videos of interactions on the street or when ICE comes.  The people who take on this role will be witnesses about what has happened.  They will be asked to write letters to the editor and/or post the videos online.

Contact “El Centro” or “City of Bloomington Latino Outreach”

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Latin American Consulates

Argentina
205 N. Michigan Ave, Suite 4208/09, Chicago, IL 60601
(312) 819-2610           www.cchic.mrecic.gov.ar

Belize
2535 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20008-2826
(202) 332-9636           www.embassyofbelize.org

Bolivia
1825 Connecticut Avenue N.W. Suite 200C, Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 232-4827           www.boliviawdc.org

Brazil
401 North Michigan Ave., Suite 1850, Chicago, IL 60611-4207
(312) 464-0244           http://chicago.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/

Chile
875 North Michigan Ave. Suite 3352, Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 654-8780           http://chile.gob.cl/chicago/en/

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District 10 Pro Bono Project provides free legal services

District 10 Pro Bono Project provides free legal services in Clay, Greene, Hendricks, Lawrence, Monroe, Morgan, Owen, and Putnam, Indiana. We do so with a number of innovative programs matching volunteer attorneys with clients who need help with shelter, income, safety, or access to justice.

The District 10 Pro Bono Project provides legal services to indigent people who otherwise would not be able to obtain justice. We do so by recruiting, training and recognizing attorneys from the private bar, and helping these attorneys fulfill their pro bono obligations. We support lawyers in their natural role as problem solvers, so that lawyers can help lower income people create permanent solutions to issues involving shelter, income, safety, civil liberties, access to justice, and other necessities of life. Our volunteers include judges, lawyers, professors, law students and other community members, all of whom work together to create better justice in our legal system and better lives for the people in our community.

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What is Sanctuary Everywhere?

“Sanctuary Everywhere” is the simple idea that everyday people can work to keep each other safe—wherever we are. Sanctuary can mean taking someone into a congregation to protect them, but even broader than that, sanctuary is about the community coming together to protect those who need it.

That means standing up to discrimination, harassment, and violence in our schools, congregations, public spaces, cities, streets, and everywhere it happens. Whether we are welcoming refugees or working to stop deportations, protecting religious groups who have been targeted and attacked, working to ensure that Black Lives Matter by interrupting anti-Black violence, or protecting the rights of LGBTQ people, we are all in this together.

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Bicultural students analyze Latino population

Bicultural students will hone research skills and study civic resilience of North-Central Indiana’s Latino communities this summer by analyzing data collected from surveys they create and distribute.

The students will travel to Fort Wayne, Frankfurt and other regions in Indiana beyond Tippecanoe County as part of a joint university operation between Ivy Tech Lafayette and Purdue University in a class titled “Latino Immigrants in the Crossroad of America.” The course will be led by Jay McCann, a Purdue professor of political science, and Randy Triplett, an Ivy Tech professor of political science.

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CLDC workshop focuses on community engagement

Seven people spoke about their fears in the current political climate and the future and discussed ways to be involved in community and create change even in the face of discrimination Thursday evening.

Members of the Community and Leadership Development Center led activities and discussions of community engagement during their program “Together We Rise” at La Casa Latino Cultural Center.

“It’s important to remind students that they have the power to engage and participate in democracy,” CLDC graduate assistant Alyssa Beauchamp said.

This program has occurred two times before, once with staff at the CLDC and once at the Indiana Latino Leadership Conference. Director of La Casa Lillian Casillas asked the CLDC if they could bring the program to La Casa.

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Partnership Aims to Tackle Diabetes Among Latinos

INDIANAPOLIS –

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly & Co. (NYSE: LLY) has announced a research collaboration with the William Sansum Diabetes Center in California. The pharmaceutical company says the partnership aims to improve the lives of Latino people affected by diabetes.

Lilly says the collaboration will provide insight into the unmet needs of Latino diabetes patients and help with the development of interventions that could improve health outcomes.

“This is a great opportunity for us to further understand the significant impact of diabetes for Latino families,” said Dara Schuster, senior director of U.S. Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes. “Through this collaboration, we will learn where the gaps are so we can develop meaningful solutions for the unmet needs.”

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Army Vet Who Served Two Tours In Afghanistan To Be Deported

A Chicago immigration judge ruled last week that an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan be deported back to Mexico, according to a local ABC affiliate.

The decision comes after Miguel Perez Jr. served seven years in prison for a felony drug offense. Perez, 38, was born in Mexico but has lived in the United States since the age of 8. He enlisted in the Army as a legal permanent resident in 2001 and served two tours in Afghanistan with U.S. Special Forces.

“My son served for this country, not for Mexico,” Perez’s mother, Esperanza Medina, told reporters at a Pilsen church on Sunday. 

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Illegal Immigration Doesn’t Always Match Reality

When you think of illegal immigration in the U.S., do you picture a border crosser or a visa overstayer? A family or a single person? A farmworker or a waiter?

People living in the U.S. without legal status are frequently invoked in American politics especially in recent months. But the conversation is often short on facts about the millions of people who fall into this category.

There are, however, outdated beliefs: A Pew Research Center survey in 2015 found that very few Americans are aware of recent changes in immigration patterns.

For example, the top 10 countries for visa overstays in FY 2015: #1. Canada (~93,000), #2. Mexico (~42,000)…

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Crowdsourcing Dataset Map of ICE Raids

Alternative journalism, and humor social commentary digital platform Latino Rebels launched a new crowdsourcing data campaign called MIGRAMAP that tracks and maps ICE raids. The new initiative allows everyone to pinpoint the location of these raids.

MIGRAMAP is a data tool, a social media platform and a global positioning system, all in one. The community reports the location immigration officers are raiding. The website will show a color-coded map with the data results. The tool is based on self-reports. It has the option for the community to post their own stories.

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San Jose, CA an immigration success story

Q: What have the waves of immigration meant for San Jose?

A: In Silicon Valley diversity and our immigrant community has been the secret sauce to our success. About half of our venture-funded start-ups are started by foreign born entrepreneurs. Obviously we have our share of challenges. But there’s an incredible story to tell about what immigration has brought to our community. I hope the rest of the nation will take heed.

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Immigrant rights group has ‘know your rights’ workshops

Nettie Garza said she wants to go visit her grandmother, whom she hasn’t seen in nine years, in Mexico. She has been saving up money to make the trip, but now, Garza, a green card holder, is scared to leave the country.

Garza, 29, attended Bloomington Immigrant Rights Coalition’s “Know Your Rights” workshop Tuesday evening. She wanted to be informed on what to do if her resident status is questioned in the wake of President Trump’s executive order on immigration and 
international travel.

Tuesday’s workshop was the second in a series of five workshops at the Monroe County Public Library that will teach immigrants their rights if questioned by Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement officers.

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Refugee center leaders discuss refugees and religion

Four panel members from refugee centers across Bloomington and southern Indiana gathered Tuesday evening at the Beth Shalom Congregation to discuss the refugee situation and how it related to the Bloomington community.

Heidi Smith, director of Indy Archdiocese Refugee Services; Cassandra Housley from Beth Shalom Task Force on Refugee Resettlement; Geshe Kunga from the Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center; and Kadhim Shaaban, chair of the Arab American Association of Bloomington, were all 
members of the panel.

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DACA @ IU

Indiana University has long recognized the absolute necessity of a diverse and inclusive community to an excellent education. All IU students, regardless of their background or country of origin, are welcome in our community. Each and every one brings perspectives and experiences that, taken together, enrich the educational experience and prepare our students to thrive in the 21st century. Our student body expresses who we are as a community and reflects our foundational commitment to inclusion and diversity.

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Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance (IUYA)

The Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance (IUYA) is a youth-led organization that seeks to empower young immigrants to achieve higher education and engage in the community to demand more just and humane policies that affect undocumented families. We believe we can build power by organizing at the local and statewide levels, all while providing resources to support undocumented students and their families, and creating meaningful alliances with other advocacy organizations. Our network is made up of undocumented and documented youth, allies, and affiliate organizations.

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UndocuHoosier

The Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance (IUYA) is a youth-led organization committed to empowering undocumented youth to achieve high levels of education, influence public policy, and overall improve the quality of life of undocumented communities in the state of Indiana. Our organization was established in 2011 after our founders held a peaceful sit-in at former Governor Mitch Daniels’ office asking to veto HEA 1402 and SEA 590

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Undocumented immigrants pay a higher taxes

Undocumented immigrants in the U.S. pay more than $11 billion a year in state and local taxes, according to a new study by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. In 42 states, undocumented immigrants pay in taxes a higher share of their income than do the wealthiest 1 percent in their respective states.

A common misconception is that undocumented immigrants avoid paying taxes. In fact, undocumented individuals pay sales and excise taxes, property taxes and, in some instances, personal income taxes. The study determined that at least 50 percent of undocumented households currently file income tax returns through the use of individual tax identification numbers, and many have taxes automatically deducted from their paychecks.

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