Friends remember Horseshoe Bend soldier who died in Iraq

Osorio enlisted in the Army in July 2017 after graduating from Horseshoe Bend High School and was on his first deployment. In less than two years in the military, he was decorated with several awards, including the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal.

KTVB spoke with some of his friends Wednesday night. They told us he loved his country and would do anything to help others.

[more]

Bloomington clinic provides care to immigrant community

Volunteers in Medicine of Monroe County

From the beginning of President Trump’s campaign, he has called for increased restrictions on immigration and blamed immigrants for crime and unemployment. As he has moved through his first two years of presidency, rhetoric and national policy continue to be pitted against immigrants — and the clinic is feeling the repercussions.

Shelley Sallee, Volunteers in Medicine assistant director, who began working at the clinic in 2008, said she wasn’t expecting it to be like this.

“I’ve never worked in a place that relied so heavily on the political environment,” she said. “You know, we don’t want to be political, we just want to take care of people.”

[more]

What Happened When Pete Buttigieg Tore Down Houses In Black And Latino South Bend

The way Williams-Preston sees it, there’s room for more than one hero in Buttigieg’s story.

“Some people, they’re trying to find the dirt on Pete,” she said. “I just try to encourage people. If you look at the whole story — any good story — the hero is an imperfect hero, you know what I’m saying? We don’t do everything right. The real story here is the fact that the people organized to make a change.”

[more]

IU-Bloomington School of Nursing to graduate first Latino

IU senior Mark Casanova said he would never forget when he realized the meaning of being a nurse.

He was in nursing school, observing a cesarean section during his junior year.

He saw the doctor remove not one, but two babies from the mother that day, and it opened his eyes to the effect he could have on patients and the world. Casanova said he remembered the mother’s ecstatic face while holding her twin girls.

[more]

Man was killed at Olive Garden because he was Mexican, family says

Jose Munoz, who died in last weekend’s Louisville Olive Garden shooting, was killed because he was from Mexico, family members said Wednesday.

Munoz, 25, had been living with family in Sellersburg, Indiana, for over six years. The native of Guadalajara, Mexico, worked for a concrete company and was supporting a 7-year-old son who lives in Mexico.

“He wasn’t famous. He wasn’t an artist. He wasn’t a singer,” Munoz’s older brother, Efrain, said through a translator. “But he was a very loved person.”

[more]

Growing Marijuana Industry Struggles To Attract Employees Of Color

As marijuana becomes legal around the country, blacks and Latinos are often left out of new business opportunities. Advocates say people of color are often reluctant to join the growing legal marijuana economy because they were targeted far more often than whites during the war on drugs. Studies show members of such communities were arrested and jailed for illegal marijuana use far more often than whites.

As Massachusetts developed laws for legal marijuana, officials wrote what they claimed was a first-in-the-nation Social Equity Program explicitly to give members of those communities a leg up.

But this part of the state law isn’t working — next to no black or Latino candidates have applied for licenses in Massachusetts.

[more]

IU Libraries celebrates Mexican

Students explored displays of Mexican art, history and immigration Thursday in Herman B Wells Library during the library’s Exploremos open house.

Exploremos was just one event put on as part of IU Arts and Humanities Council’s Mexico Remixed programming. The third annual remixed festival aims to celebrate the culture and history of a certain country each year through a series of events, activities and speakers, said Ed Comentale, director of the Arts and Humanities Council.

“It celebrates our international students, showcases our resources and knowledge in that area and explores current art and culture from that country,” Comentale said. “When we say remixed, we are referring to people who are actively remaking and rethinking the traditions of their country.”

[more]

Brokaw suggested Latino immigrants’ kids don’t assimilate. That’s a myth!

Historians have noted that this is a tale as old as the United States itself. The very same critiques we hear now about Latino immigrants were once used to criticize large groups of immigrants who arrived from Europe. And over the past few decades, this kind of comment has been a regular refrain as part of arguments against immigration.
But for years, study after study has shown it simply isn’t true.
As Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography for the Pew Research Center, noted on Twitter, Latinos’ English proficiency has been on the rise for years. In fact, researchers have observed this for over a decade, he told CNN.

[more]

Five myths about MS-13

The Trump administration’s campaign against immigration conflates the flow of undocumented immigrants from Central America with the growth of MS-13 – the brutal transnational street gang. The president and the attorney general frequently say that stopping the former means stopping the latter. Information about the four-decade-old gang, formally named Mara Salvatrucha, is scarce, but we know enough to dispel some of the misconceptions that have grown up around it.

Myth No. 1
MS-13 was created by Salvadoran ex-guerrillas.

The gang originated in Los Angeles, mostly in the areas of Korea Town, Pico Union and Westlake, in the early 1980s. It was formed by children of refugees

[more]