Graduate seeks to help reduce infant mortality rate

Fresh out of college with her health sciences degree, Andrea Zepeda is urging mothers to think inside the Baby Box, as a community health doula for Community Wellness Partners in Cass County.

“Not having a safe place to sleep can be fatal for an infant,” said Zepeda, who graduated in December from Indiana University Kokomo. “The box has a padded mat in it, and nothing else, so the baby sleeps in the safest possible environment, and has one less risk factor.”

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We Locked Four Experts in a Room Until They Solved Immigration

Over 120 minutes, we learned a lot about the contours of the current immigration debate—what both sides really care about (and if it’s actually Trump’s wall) and whether, somewhere out there, there is a deal that just might be palatable to advocates who like immigration and to those who want less of it. The answer is, actually yes. No question, the results were surprising. Congress, are you listening?

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Building A Latino-Muslim Coalition With #TacoTrucksAtEveryMosque

The connection between Middle Eastern and Mexican food goes all the way back to the Moors, and is well-known in culinary circles. Al pastor tacos are just a pork version of the shawarma spits that Lebanese immigrants brought with them to Mexico City in the 1930s. In nearby Puebla, a wrap called tacos árabes — Arabic tacos — uses a flatbread that’s halfway between pita and lavash. Kibbe (fried meatballs made from bulghur wheat) is popular in the Yucatán, thanks to Syrians who settled in the Peninsula over the past century. And the Lebanese-Mexican Chedraui family of Mexico City owns one of the largest Latino supermarket chains in the United States, El Super.

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Hurricane Maria Assistance Program

As Puerto Rico continues to rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, Indiana University is offering qualified undergraduate students who are currently enrolled in accredited Puerto Rican colleges and universities the opportunity to spend the Spring 2018 semester at any IU campus. Find information for Puerto Rican students interested in a visiting semester at IU and information for IU faculty who would like to sponsor these students.

Latino Civil Rights Leader Speaks Out About Trump’s Immigration Framework

This week, the head of the country’s oldest Latino civil rights organization took a surprising position. We are talking about Roger Rocha. He’s president of LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens. On Sunday, he endorsed White House principles for an immigration deal in a letter of thanks to President Trump. Those principles include border security, ending the visa lottery, cutting back on family reunification along with DACA, legalizing people who were brought over the border as young children. Rocha withdrew his letter after an outpouring of criticism and calls for him to resign.

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Company scraps plan for Indiana immigrant detention center

Goshen Mayor Jeremy Stutsman, wrote a letter opposing the construction of the detention center and gained a number of co-signers from the business community, was pleased with CoreCivic’s decision.

“(I’m) obviously pretty happy they decided to move on and very grateful for the amount of community members, businesses leaders and elected officials for their work to benefit our county,” Stutsman said.

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Heartland Democrats to Washington: You’re Killing Us

AUSTIN, Ind.—Steering his white Dodge Ram while wearing a tan knit cap, a drab green Carhartt coat and a smear of brown livestock feed on his cheek, Terry Goodin jounced over frozen-hard mud toward his 100 head of beef cattle. “Make sure they’re all four legs down and not four legs up, in this kind of weather,” he told me in his southern Indiana drawl. The temperature overnight had dipped toward zero. Now, midmorning, it stood at 16 degrees. On the rear of his old pickup truck was a “Farmers For Goodin” bumper sticker, and rattling around his head were thoughts of what he was going to say the following week in a starkly different setting—up in Indianapolis, at the regal limestone capitol building, in his introductory speech as the leader of his caucus in the state legislature.

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Identity Fades As Immigrant Ties Weaken

Latinos are one of the fastest-growing racial or ethnic groups in the U.S. But a new finding by the Pew Research Center suggests the Hispanic population may not get as big as demographers have predicted.

About one in 10 adults with Hispanic parents, grandparents or other ancestors do not identify as Hispanic or Latino, according to Pew. The report estimates this group includes close to five million people, many of whom say their background is “mixed” or their Hispanic roots are “too far back.”

“It’s not that they’re hiding their Hispanic background,” says Mark Hugo Lopez, Pew’s director of Hispanic research who co-wrote the report. “But they just don’t self-identify or feel that they should affiliate themselves with being Hispanic or identifying as Latino.”

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Letter from City Commission regarding current latino affairs

October 4, 2017

Members of the Bloomington Community,

For years the City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs has served to identify and research the issues which impact the Hispanic/Latino populations in Bloomington, especially in the areas of health, education, public safety and cultural competency.

We support all Hispanics/Latinos including immigrants, refugees, and multi-generational U.S.-born folks who despite lifetimes in the U.S. are identified as Hispanic/Latino according to U.S. census.  While the commission is not affiliated or motivated by any political party, we cannot deny that our work and sentiment is affected by the national rhetoric which vilifies and, in some cases, criminalizes the very existence of people in our community.

The decision to end DACA destabilizes the lives and futures for hundreds of thousands of folks who have no other crime than having been born outside of the lines you and I know as the U.S. border.  The impact of the DACA repeal means splitting up families, interrupting communities and workplaces, and deporting adults and children to countries they have never really known.  And for those of us who stay, we lose relationships, and we lose our emotional and economic investments in believing in and professing an American dream for all.

We hope to serve as a catalyst to promote positive public and private solutions to multi-faceted issues confronting Hispanic/Latino neighbors ensuring to document the resulting effects of action and inaction on our community.  We unreservedly oppose the decision of the Trump Administration to end DACA especially without a defined and humane path forward for our neighbors, friends, and family.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has studied and proposed common sense immigration reform for years and published detailed analysis to dispel myths, which are used for political advantage.  Opinions and false conclusions have been related as truths regarding “illegals” so we compiled a shortlist of facts for clarity.

Undocumented folks:
1. Do not receive free government healthcare.  Undocumented folks do not qualify for Medicaid or the Healthy Indiana Plan.

2. Do not take jobs that would be filled by citizens.  There is no correlation between high unemployment and immigration.  Findings indicate undocumented folks become entrepreneurs – create jobs – at twice the rate as U.S.-born folks.

3. Do pay taxes.  Taxes paid by undocumented folks proportionately to U.S.-born folks include property, excise, and sales tax.  Also federal, state and local income taxes, Social Security and Medicare taxes are automatically deducted from paychecks just like everyone else.  In 2013, undocumented folks contributed $11.6 billion in state and local taxes.

4.  Are not eligible tax-funded benefit programs.  Data from the Social Security Administration shows that in 2010 undocumented folks paid $13 billion in payroll taxes to Social Security and Medicare, benefits that are only accessible to citizens.

Additional findings by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce include:

– Immigrants do not drive down wages of U.S.-born workers.

–  Immigrants have economically revitalized many communities.

–  Immigrants do not cause crime rates to rise and are less likely to commit crime than U.S.-born individuals.

–  Mass deportation of undocumented immigrants would severely damage the U.S. economy.

Facts and statistics aside, we must remember that DACA recipients are human beings and members of our community.  DACA recipients have lived in the U.S. most of their lives – this is home.   DACA recipients have families, jobs, and contributors to our community.  To drive them away will not just damage our community as a whole but, at its base, it is cruel and inhumane.

Sincerely,
City of Bloomington Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs

CHLA Letter to HT October 4 2017

Book chronicles family’s roots from Mexico to Gary

“We had a very small wedding but solemn at church,” the new bride wrote in English, her second language.

An orchestra played at the church early that morning, and again at the couple’s wedding reception in San Francisco del Rincon, the municipal seat in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The groom requested the song, “Siempre te amare,” or “I’ll always love you.”

The young Francesca had no idea how important her writings would become to her family decades later and into the 21st century.

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Federal judge prohibits ICE detainers in Marion County

A federal judge has approved of a settlement between the ACLU of Indiana and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office to end Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold requests on people accused of living in the country illegally unless there is a warrant.

The action comes despite the U.S. Justice Department’s intervention in the case and requests that the Sheriff’s Office comply with the ICE seizure requests.

In a 36-page order handed down Tuesday evening, U.S. District Judge Sarah Evans Barker issued an injunction that prevents the Sheriff’s Office from detaining any person based solely on detention requests from ICE unless there is a warrant or probable cause.

An ICE detainer is a request of local police to hold people in jail beyond the time when they otherwise should be released, generally a 48-hour period. ICE is seeking more time to check their citizenship status and, if needed, get a deportation warrant, even if the initial arrest is for something minor, say a traffic infraction.

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1 In 3 Latinos Report Discrimination

About a third of Latinos in America say they’ve been personally discriminated against when it comes to applying for jobs, being paid equally or considered for promotions — and when trying to rent a room or apartment or buy a house. Slightly more (37 percent) say they’ve personally experienced racial or ethnic slurs because of their race or ethnicity.

These are some of the key findings NPR is releasing Wednesday from a poll done with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The survey of 3,453 adults looked at a wide range of issues in many groups and included 803 adults identifying as Latino or Hispanic. The poll also surveyed African-Americans, white Americans, Native Americans, Asian-Americans and LGBTQ adults. We are releasing data by each of these groups on a weekly basis.

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Facing Discrimination In Public Life, Latinos Stay Positive About Government

Latinos say institutional discrimination, including discrimination while trying to vote or participate in politics, is a problem in America today. However, when asked, many Latinos reported feeling better about their local government.

That’s according to a new survey out this week from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The survey found that 15 percent of Latinos say they’ve been discriminated against personally when trying to vote or participate in politics because they are Latino. Separately, 1 in 10 says that where he or she lives, other Latinos are “often” discriminated against in voting or politics.

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No documentation? No problem

Dominguez noted that the credit union does not concern itself with the documentation status of the immigrants it is trying to serve. “Our role is to provide education and banking services to people that present the necessary documentation to open accounts with us,” he said, citing such identification vehicles as Individual Taxpayer Identification numbers, Social Security numbers, the Matricula Consular cards (an ID card issued by the Mexican government), passports and electoral IDs, among others.

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Indiana Minority Children More Likely To Face Obstacles

Children in Indiana’s minority and immigrant populations often have a more difficult start in life according to the conclusions of the latest look at disparity in wellbeing for Hoosier kids.

About 20 percent of Indiana’s population identifies as African-American, Hispanic, Asian or another non-white race.

Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman says a new report from the Annie E. Casey foundation finds children in these households are less likely to benefit from opportunities to grow and develop.

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BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

DE PUEBLO A PUEBLO: A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR PUERTO RICO, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH, 2017
BUSKIRK-CHUMLEY THEATRE
7:00 p.m.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo: A Benefit Concert for Puerto Rico, Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands’ serves as the kickoff event to raise funds for communities in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean recently impacted by devastating natural disasters. The event will showcase a diverse collection of Latin American and Caribbean music, performed by artists who have made Southern Indiana their home, including performances by cellist Emilio Colón, Mariachi Perla del Medio Oeste, Orquesta Escuela Vieja, Soneros la Caliza and other special guests. It will also feature a series of short presentations by Bloomington community members who have recently visited the affected areas.

‘De Pueblo a Pueblo ~ From People to People,’ is a volunteer-based initiative of concerned citizens from Bloomington, Indiana, many of whom have personal and/or professional roots in Puerto Rico, Mexico and the Caribbean. This effort counts with the support of the City of Bloomington, local community leaders and organizations, Indiana University faculty, students and staff, as well as the collaboration of the Centro Comunal Latino, the Center for Sustainable Living and the Narra Foundation.

Want to help? Please consider making a donation. Thank you!

A map’s worth of Hispanic heritage

On the third floor of the Student Union—on any given day or time—Latinx students can be found, some speaking in English and others in their native language. They swap stories of the day, share their passions, wishes and support one another. Over the past month, the Office of Latino Programs and Services has celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15); here are their stories.

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Bloomington celebrates the end of Hispanic Heritage Month

“We host this event every year to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and celebrate the independence of many nations,” Overman said. “We try to change it a little each year, but keep the things people love, like music.”

Overman said this event is to both celebrate and educate. Monroe County Public Library offers bilingual storytelling and has many Spanish media selections available, and this event helps spread awareness of these resources and gets the community involved.

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Latino community remembers heritage

The event marked the annual celebration of “Nuestras Raices,” translating to “Our Roots,” an event set up by the Latino Graduate Student Association. About 15 group members ranging from freshmen to graduate students to staff members gathered to share stories of their families in the Latino community.

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Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Caribbean relief efforts

Dear community:

As all of you are aware, neighbors in our hemisphere have suffered tremendous loss in recent weeks. Mexico’s earthquakes hit very hard the southern states, Mexico City and Morelia. In addition, two hurricanes, Irma and María, devastated many Caribbean nations, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. As members of the Indiana University community, we are reaching out to our colleagues, students, staff, and friends in an effort to provide support to our many sister communities, where many of us who are part of IU have our roots as well as many family members and friends.

Hoping to contribute to the relief efforts, we have identified organizations that are assisting communities affected by these catastrophic events. Most of these organizations have been vetted by independent agencies and have an established track record of working with local communities in need. Following is a list of organizations/agencies that are providing relief to Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean. The websites provide information about the mission of these organizations and instructions about how to make donations online.

Mexico Earthquake Relief:
International Community Foundation:
https://donate.icfdn.org/npo/international-disaster-relief-fund

National Museum of Mexican Art Chicago for Mexico and Puerto Rico Relief Fund:
http://nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org/relief

Hispanic Federation:
https://hispanicfederation.org/donate

Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief:
Hurricane María Community Recovery Fund: https://connect.clickandpledge.com/w/Form/cb4a3c78-5694-4324-bead-42c8ad94c1bf

Episcopal Relief Fund:
http://www.episcopalrelief.org/

Fundación Comunitaria de Puerto Rico:
https://www.fcpr.org

U.S. Virgin Islands and the Caribbean:
All Hands:
https://www.hands.org/projects/hurricane-irma-maria-response/

Unicef:
https://www.unicefusa.org

Your contribution is greatly appreciated. These communities will survive and thrive, but need our support.

Thank you. Gracias.

In solidarity/En solidaridad,

Raquel Anderson – Professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Arlene J. Díaz – Associate Professor, Department of History
Luis A. González – Associate Librarian, IU Libraries
Juan Manuel Soto-Arriví – Senior Lecturer, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

9,840 DACA Recipients In Indiana Impacted By Trump’s Decision

9,840 Hoosiers receive benefits from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, according to the most recent data from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

As NPR reports, President Donald Trump announced Tuesday he is ending thee program in the next six months, giving Congress a chance to codify the program’s legal protections into law.

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Federal judge criticized by Trump returning home to Indiana for special celebration

Judge Gonzalo Curiel, the California federal jurist attacked by then presidential candidate Donald Trump, will be returning to his home state of Indiana to help commemorate the Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.

The federal court will host the event at 2 p.m. Oct. 6 in the Sarah Evans Barker Courtroom at the Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse in Indianapolis. Jointly sponsored by the Southern District and the Indiana State Bar Association Latino Affairs Committee, the program is free and open to the public. Attorneys will be eligible for continuing legal education credit but pre-registration is required. Visit http://www.inbar.org/event/2017Curiel  for more information.

Curiel gained national fame when Trump in 2016 questioned his abilities as a jurist and loyalties as an American. The attack came after the judge allowed lawsuits filed by former students against Trump University to proceed. On the campaign trail, Trump wrongly described Curiel as a Mexican and insinuated the judge was issuing biased rulings because Trump was taking a strong stance against immigration.

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