Census: More Latinos List Themselves as White

The latest census figures also show the number of Americans who identified themselves as partly black and partly white more than doubled to 1.8 million. For the first time, the black-white combination is the most prevalent group among multiracial Americans, making up 1 in 5 members of that subgroup. They exceed the number of multi-racials who identified as being white and “some other race,” composed of mostly Hispanics, as well as white-Asians and white-American Indians.

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La Casa target of racial harassment

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

Four films you don’t want to miss during National Hispanic Heritage MonthCuatro filmes que no deberias perderte durante el National Hispanic Heritage Month

This event is sponsored by the IU Spanish Department, IU International Latin American and Spain
Students Association y LA CASA.

“Tambien la lluvia”: Sept 21, 7pm. WY  015. Dir: Iciar Bollain. España,2010
Spain entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal)travels to Bolivia to shoot a
film about Christopher Columbus. He and his crew arrive during the tense time of
the Cochabamba water crisis, the 2000 Cochabamba protests. The lines
between past and present, fiction and film, become increasingly blurred.

“Carancho”: Sept 26, 7pm. WY 015 Dir:Pablo Trapero.Argentina,2010
Argentina entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Sosa (Ricardo Darin, “The Secret in Their Eyes”) is an
ambulance-chasing personal injury attorney with questionable ethics.
Lujan (Martina Gusman, “Lion’s Den”) is a young, idealistic country
doctor, new to the city. After Lujan and Sosa’s paths repeatedly cross,
the two form an unlikely romance that is threatened by Sosa’s turbulent
past. With traffic accidents as the number one cause of deaths in
Argentina, bodies are currency and a black market strives to get rich
from the personal tragedies that literally litter the
argentinean streets.

“El infierno” Oct 5, 7pm. WY 015 Dir: Luis Estrada. Mexico, 2010
Golden Ariel for Best Director and Best Movie

Benjamín “Benny” García is deported from the United States to his
hometown in Mexico. Back home is a bleak picture, he can’t find an
honest job and most of the town is held with the business of drug
trafficking. Benny gets involved in the narco business, a “spectacular”
job where he gets a lot of money, women and fun. But soon he finds out
that the violent criminal life is not easy and much less fun.

“Abel”: Oct 13, 7pm. WH 009 Dir:Diego Luna. Mexico, 2010
Nominated for Ariel’s Best movie, Best Director and among last 3
Mexican finalists as entry for Oscars.

About a peculiar young boy who, as he blurs reality and fantasy, takes
over the responsibilities of a family man in his father’s absence.Este evento es auspiciado por el Departmento de Español, International Latin American and Spain
Students Association y LA CASA.

“Tambien la lluvia”: Sept 21, 7pm. WY  015. Dir: Iciar Bollain. España,2010
Spain entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal)travels to Bolivia to shoot a
film about Christopher Columbus. He and his crew arrive during the tense time of
the Cochabamba water crisis, the 2000 Cochabamba protests. The lines
between past and present, fiction and film, become increasingly blurred.

“Carancho”: Sept 26, 7pm. WY 015 Dir:Pablo Trapero.Argentina,2010
Argentina entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Sosa (Ricardo Darin, “The Secret in Their Eyes”) is an
ambulance-chasing personal injury attorney with questionable ethics.
Lujan (Martina Gusman, “Lion’s Den”) is a young, idealistic country
doctor, new to the city. After Lujan and Sosa’s paths repeatedly cross,
the two form an unlikely romance that is threatened by Sosa’s turbulent
past. With traffic accidents as the number one cause of deaths in
Argentina, bodies are currency and a black market strives to get rich
from the personal tragedies that literally litter the
argentinean streets.

“El infierno” Oct 5, 7pm. WY 015 Dir: Luis Estrada. Mexico, 2010
Golden Ariel for Best Director and Best Movie

Benjamín “Benny” García is deported from the United States to his
hometown in Mexico. Back home is a bleak picture, he can’t find an
honest job and most of the town is held with the business of drug
trafficking. Benny gets involved in the narco business, a “spectacular”
job where he gets a lot of money, women and fun. But soon he finds out
that the violent criminal life is not easy and much less fun.

“Abel”: Oct 13, 7pm. WH 009 Dir:Diego Luna. Mexico, 2010
Nominated for Ariel’s Best movie, Best Director and among last 3
Mexican finalists as entry for Oscars.

About a peculiar young boy who, as he blurs reality and fantasy, takes
over the responsibilities of a family man in his father’s absence.

10 Myths About Immigration

Myths about immigration and immigrants are common. Here are a few of the most frequently heard misconceptions along with information to help you and your students separate fact from fear.

When students make statements that are mistaken or inaccurate, one response is to simply ask, “How do you know that’s true?” Whatever the answer—even if it’s “That’s what my parents say”—probe a little more to get at the source. Ask, “Where do you think they got that information?” or “That sounds like it might be an opinion and not a fact.” Guide students to find a reliable source and help them figure out how to check the facts.

10 Myths About Immigration | Teaching Tolerance

Myths about immigration and immigrants are common. Here are a few of the most frequently heard misconceptions along with information to help you and your students separate fact from fear.

When students make statements that are mistaken or inaccurate, one response is to simply ask, “How do you know that’s true?” Whatever the answer—even if it’s “That’s what my parents say”—probe a little more to get at the source. Ask, “Where do you think they got that information?” or “That sounds like it might be an opinion and not a fact.” Guide students to find a reliable source and help them figure out how to check the facts.

10 Myths About Immigration | Teaching Tolerance

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

ICE-arrest1Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

DO IMMIGRANTS INCREASE THE CRIME RATE?

-U.S.-born men age 18-39 are 5 times more likely to be incarcerated than male immigrants of the same age.
-Data from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 census reports show that for every ethnic group, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are least educated and least acculturated.
-The number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. doubled from 1994 to 2005, but during that time period violent crime actually decreased by 34.2%. At the same time, property crimes also decreased by 26.4%.

Source: Immigration Policy Center Report Immigrants and Crime: Are They Connected? A Century of Research Finds that Crime Rates for Immigrants are Lower than for the Native-Born
The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.-U.S.-born men age 18-39 are 5 times more likely to be incarcerated than male immigrants of the same age.
-Data from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 census reports show that for every ethnic group, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are least educated and least acculturated.
-The number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. doubled from 1994 to 2005, but during that time period violent crime actually decreased by 34.2%. At the same time, property crimes also decreased by 26.4%.

Source: Immigration Policy Center Report Immigrants and Crime: Are They Connected? A Century of Research Finds that Crime Rates for Immigrants are Lower than for the Native-Born
The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

Deporting Undocumented Immigrants Would Help Our Economy, Right?

WRONG.

Fact: Eliminating undocumented immigrants from the workforce in the U.S. would not help the economy; in fact, the average loss of 3% of all jobs country-wide would cost the U.S. over $651.5 billion dollars in yearly economic output, as well as $1.757 trillion in annual spending.

-Source: Report from the The Perryman Group

________________________________

Fact: Overall, the cost to state and national economies would be astronomical if undocumented workers were removed from the workforce; and this cost would come on top of the cost of litigating and implementing labor laws seeking to remove undocumented immigrants from the workforce.

Source: The Immigration Policy Center report: “The Economics of Immigration Reform: Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants Would Benefit All U.S. Workers and Businesses.

____________________________________

Fact: The costliness of enforcing local immigration laws has already been exemplified by the following case studies.

-ARIZONA: S.B. 1070 led to a boycott of Arizona’s tourism and convention industry that will ultimately cost the state $253 million in economic output and upwards of $86 million in lost wages over the next 2-3 years.

HAZELTON, PENNSYLVANIA: Currently has an immigration control ordinance undergoing litigation.  The litigation has already cost $2.8 million, and it is estimated the cost could exceed $5 million.

RIVERSIDE, NEW JERSEY: The town briefly enacted its own immigration law.  During its brief enactment, Riverside spent $82,000 and lost commercial tax revenues because of business closings.  Riverside reversed the law in hopes of bringing immigrants back to the town to help refuel the economy.

FARMERS BRANCH, TEXAS (a small Dallas suburb): This suburb has already spent $4 million defending its immigration ordinance.  Legal fees are estimated to hit $5 million.

Source: Center for American Progress


_______________________________

About the Sources…

The Perryman Group is an economic and financial analysis firm.  The firm was founded by Dr. M. Ray Perryman, a widely accredited economist.  Although TPG’s founder Dr. Perryman has been acknowledged by the U.S. Congress and the Texas Legislature, he does not openly express any political ties that would have biased this information.

-This particular study was conducted for Americans for Immigration Reform, the Business community’s voice on sensible immigration reform.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

-The IPC is responsible for the American Immigration Council’s research. The American Immigration Council (formerly the American Immigration Law Foundation) was established in 1987 as an IRS designated 501(c)(3),  tax-exempt, not-for-profit educational, charitable organization.

Center for American Progress: The Center for American Progress (CAP) is a self-described “progressive” organization.  It openly admits that it is critical of conservative policymaking. Nonetheless, the Center for American Progress Action Fund is a non-profit, non-partisan organization.

 

 


 

 

Deportation Halted for Some Students as Lawmakers Seek New Policy

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com