IU Maurer School of Law professors to discuss affirmative action case

“The court’s decision to hear the case raises the possibility of an end to the consideration of race in public university admissions decisions,” said Dawn Johnsen, Walter W. Foskett Professor of Law. “In 2003, a majority of the court said that its holding in Grutter v. Bollinger, which upheld the inclusion of race as one among many factors to create a diverse student body, would last for 25 years. It appears that the end might be coming sooner than originally expected.”

Panelists include Maurer School of Law faculty members Johnsen, Jeannine Bell, Daniel Conkle and Luis Fuentes-Rohwer. Professor Kevin Brown will moderate the discussion.

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IU Cinema to host ‘Cinema Maldito: On the Margins of Brazilian Cinema’ film series

The three films selected for the series represent a variety of styles and approaches, including low-budget horror with “This Night I Will Possess Your Corpse” (7 p.m. Feb. 23) and an incisive critique of the Brazilian ’60s with “Romance” (9:30 p.m. Feb. 24). The series also includes Rogerio Sganzerla’s “Red Light Bandit” (6:30 p.m. Feb. 24), the film that more than any other launched what became known as the Brazilian underground or “cinema marginal.”

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IU kicks off Black History Month activities

The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center also will be the location of IU’s 2012 Black History Month Celebration Kick-Off, from 4 to 6 p.m. Monday.

Other events during the first week of the celebration are a reading by Nikky Finney, winner of the National Book Award; a musical concert; screenings of films in the “Black in Latin America” series; and a “Family Dinner at the NMBCC.”

IU’s African American Choral Ensemble will perform from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the atrium of the IU School of Education, 201 N. Rose Ave.

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Show tunes to Latino culture

Hola Bloomington is a news and public affairs show that features a weekly wrap-up of local news, a guest interview, information about local events and volunteer opportunities and short segments that vary by week. The show broadcasts live from 6 to 7 p.m. every Friday on FM channels 91.3 and 98.1 in Bloomington, 100.7 in Nashville, Ind., and 106.3 in Ellettsville, Ind.

idsnews article

 

Public Wants Immigrants to Be Able to Stay

As the debate over immigration continues to roil the Republican presidential field, a substantial majority of Americans say they would prefer to allow some or all illegal immigrants to remain in the United States, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found.

[More]

When asked what should be done with the roughly 11 million illegal immigrants in the country, just 25 percent of those polled said that they should all be deported “no matter how long they have been in the U.S.”

Beardstown, Small Midwestern Meatpacking Town, Wrestles With Immigration Issue

“It used to be that something happened in Beardstown, and people would blame it on a Mexican,” Walters said. “But, if you look at the numbers, there’s really no difference in the rate of crimes between Hispanics and whites in our city. It’s just not the case.”

Researchers Mark Mather and Kevin Pollard of the Population Reference Bureau, a nonpartisan research organization, say that Latino immigration has helped revive the populations of small townssuch as Beardstown all across the Midwest and Great Plains. Between 2000 and 2006, the researchers found that total population in small towns and rural areas increased only by 3 percent, while Hispanic population grew by 22 percent. Since 1990, the Hispanic population in small towns and rural areas has more than doubled.

[More]

Obama administration asks courts to block parts of tough Alabama immigration law

Please go to cnn.com to read the whole story about the Obama adminstration’s attempts to prevent a “tough new immigration law” from being enacted in Alabama.

According to CNN, these are the story highlighlights:

-The Justice Department asks for an injunction from an appeals court
-The state of Alabama will have to respond in the coming days
-Some parts of the law were already blocked by a federal judge

Immigrants can save your community

The New York Times published an article yesterday dealing with this subject. I’ll post a long excerpt here but I highly recommend that you click through and read the whole thing (then go and read Caught in the Middle). How the Midwest and the Plains states accommodate or resist this immigration will be the defining feature of the next 50 years for these communities. The data is clear though; successful communities are ones that embrace immigrants.

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Use of and Contribution to Public Benefits

MYTH: Immigrants abuse public benefits.  American citizens are paying for their social well-being.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Fact: Undocumented immigrants DO pay taxes.  In 2007, unauthorized immigrants in Indiana paid roughly $255.9 million in taxes.  Additionally, authorized immigrants who were not U.S. citizens paid $901.7 million in taxes, and naturalized immigrants paid $1.2 billion in taxes.

-Source: Immigration Policy Center

______________________________________________________________________________

Fact: If all unauthorized immigrants left Indiana, the state would lose $2.8 billion in economic activity, $1.3 billion in gross state product, and approximately 16,739 jobs, even after the market had time to readjust.

            -Source: The Perryman Group

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Beyond 2012 Field, Nuanced G.O.P. Views on Immigrants

This New York Times article discusses the role many Republican freshmen are taking in advocating for the redefinition of “their party’s increasingly anti-immigration image, even as they maintain a strong push for better federal border security.”  Many of these Republicans are pushing for limited immigration measures to be taken (e.g., shortening the green card process).  Overall, this article is a highly relevant, interesting read!

Immigration issues reach Ball State

Issues of immigration aren’t just found in legislatures of the Southwest. They’ve found their way into Indiana politics, and students from Ball State have said they’re disappointed with laws that restrict undocumented students from paying in-state tuition.

[Read more]

Voices for Justice from the Latino press

Did you know the first printed news in the Americas was published in Mexico, in Spanish, more than a hundred years before Ben Franklin and English-language newspapers? And that the first printing press on the continent was brought to Mexico City in 1535? I didn’t know, until I listened to Felix Gutierrez, a professor of journalism and communication at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School, when he visited the University of Minnesota in September as a guest of the journalism school. He’s an impressive scholar, and the pre-eminent historian of Latino media in the United States.

The beginnings of the Latino press in this country go back more than 200 years to a New Orleans newspaper called El Misisipi…[more]

Census: More Latinos List Themselves as White

The latest census figures also show the number of Americans who identified themselves as partly black and partly white more than doubled to 1.8 million. For the first time, the black-white combination is the most prevalent group among multiracial Americans, making up 1 in 5 members of that subgroup. They exceed the number of multi-racials who identified as being white and “some other race,” composed of mostly Hispanics, as well as white-Asians and white-American Indians.

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La Casa target of racial harassment

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

Four films you don’t want to miss during National Hispanic Heritage MonthCuatro filmes que no deberias perderte durante el National Hispanic Heritage Month

This event is sponsored by the IU Spanish Department, IU International Latin American and Spain
Students Association y LA CASA.

“Tambien la lluvia”: Sept 21, 7pm. WY  015. Dir: Iciar Bollain. España,2010
Spain entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal)travels to Bolivia to shoot a
film about Christopher Columbus. He and his crew arrive during the tense time of
the Cochabamba water crisis, the 2000 Cochabamba protests. The lines
between past and present, fiction and film, become increasingly blurred.

“Carancho”: Sept 26, 7pm. WY 015 Dir:Pablo Trapero.Argentina,2010
Argentina entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Sosa (Ricardo Darin, “The Secret in Their Eyes”) is an
ambulance-chasing personal injury attorney with questionable ethics.
Lujan (Martina Gusman, “Lion’s Den”) is a young, idealistic country
doctor, new to the city. After Lujan and Sosa’s paths repeatedly cross,
the two form an unlikely romance that is threatened by Sosa’s turbulent
past. With traffic accidents as the number one cause of deaths in
Argentina, bodies are currency and a black market strives to get rich
from the personal tragedies that literally litter the
argentinean streets.

“El infierno” Oct 5, 7pm. WY 015 Dir: Luis Estrada. Mexico, 2010
Golden Ariel for Best Director and Best Movie

Benjamín “Benny” García is deported from the United States to his
hometown in Mexico. Back home is a bleak picture, he can’t find an
honest job and most of the town is held with the business of drug
trafficking. Benny gets involved in the narco business, a “spectacular”
job where he gets a lot of money, women and fun. But soon he finds out
that the violent criminal life is not easy and much less fun.

“Abel”: Oct 13, 7pm. WH 009 Dir:Diego Luna. Mexico, 2010
Nominated for Ariel’s Best movie, Best Director and among last 3
Mexican finalists as entry for Oscars.

About a peculiar young boy who, as he blurs reality and fantasy, takes
over the responsibilities of a family man in his father’s absence.Este evento es auspiciado por el Departmento de Español, International Latin American and Spain
Students Association y LA CASA.

“Tambien la lluvia”: Sept 21, 7pm. WY  015. Dir: Iciar Bollain. España,2010
Spain entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal)travels to Bolivia to shoot a
film about Christopher Columbus. He and his crew arrive during the tense time of
the Cochabamba water crisis, the 2000 Cochabamba protests. The lines
between past and present, fiction and film, become increasingly blurred.

“Carancho”: Sept 26, 7pm. WY 015 Dir:Pablo Trapero.Argentina,2010
Argentina entry to Oscar’s Best Foreign film

Sosa (Ricardo Darin, “The Secret in Their Eyes”) is an
ambulance-chasing personal injury attorney with questionable ethics.
Lujan (Martina Gusman, “Lion’s Den”) is a young, idealistic country
doctor, new to the city. After Lujan and Sosa’s paths repeatedly cross,
the two form an unlikely romance that is threatened by Sosa’s turbulent
past. With traffic accidents as the number one cause of deaths in
Argentina, bodies are currency and a black market strives to get rich
from the personal tragedies that literally litter the
argentinean streets.

“El infierno” Oct 5, 7pm. WY 015 Dir: Luis Estrada. Mexico, 2010
Golden Ariel for Best Director and Best Movie

Benjamín “Benny” García is deported from the United States to his
hometown in Mexico. Back home is a bleak picture, he can’t find an
honest job and most of the town is held with the business of drug
trafficking. Benny gets involved in the narco business, a “spectacular”
job where he gets a lot of money, women and fun. But soon he finds out
that the violent criminal life is not easy and much less fun.

“Abel”: Oct 13, 7pm. WH 009 Dir:Diego Luna. Mexico, 2010
Nominated for Ariel’s Best movie, Best Director and among last 3
Mexican finalists as entry for Oscars.

About a peculiar young boy who, as he blurs reality and fantasy, takes
over the responsibilities of a family man in his father’s absence.

10 Myths About Immigration

Myths about immigration and immigrants are common. Here are a few of the most frequently heard misconceptions along with information to help you and your students separate fact from fear.

When students make statements that are mistaken or inaccurate, one response is to simply ask, “How do you know that’s true?” Whatever the answer—even if it’s “That’s what my parents say”—probe a little more to get at the source. Ask, “Where do you think they got that information?” or “That sounds like it might be an opinion and not a fact.” Guide students to find a reliable source and help them figure out how to check the facts.

10 Myths About Immigration | Teaching Tolerance

Myths about immigration and immigrants are common. Here are a few of the most frequently heard misconceptions along with information to help you and your students separate fact from fear.

When students make statements that are mistaken or inaccurate, one response is to simply ask, “How do you know that’s true?” Whatever the answer—even if it’s “That’s what my parents say”—probe a little more to get at the source. Ask, “Where do you think they got that information?” or “That sounds like it might be an opinion and not a fact.” Guide students to find a reliable source and help them figure out how to check the facts.

10 Myths About Immigration | Teaching Tolerance

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

ICE-arrest1Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

DO IMMIGRANTS INCREASE THE CRIME RATE?

-U.S.-born men age 18-39 are 5 times more likely to be incarcerated than male immigrants of the same age.
-Data from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 census reports show that for every ethnic group, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are least educated and least acculturated.
-The number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. doubled from 1994 to 2005, but during that time period violent crime actually decreased by 34.2%. At the same time, property crimes also decreased by 26.4%.

Source: Immigration Policy Center Report Immigrants and Crime: Are They Connected? A Century of Research Finds that Crime Rates for Immigrants are Lower than for the Native-Born
The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.-U.S.-born men age 18-39 are 5 times more likely to be incarcerated than male immigrants of the same age.
-Data from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 census reports show that for every ethnic group, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are least educated and least acculturated.
-The number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. doubled from 1994 to 2005, but during that time period violent crime actually decreased by 34.2%. At the same time, property crimes also decreased by 26.4%.

Source: Immigration Policy Center Report Immigrants and Crime: Are They Connected? A Century of Research Finds that Crime Rates for Immigrants are Lower than for the Native-Born
The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

Deporting Undocumented Immigrants Would Help Our Economy, Right?

WRONG.

Fact: Eliminating undocumented immigrants from the workforce in the U.S. would not help the economy; in fact, the average loss of 3% of all jobs country-wide would cost the U.S. over $651.5 billion dollars in yearly economic output, as well as $1.757 trillion in annual spending.

-Source: Report from the The Perryman Group

________________________________

Fact: Overall, the cost to state and national economies would be astronomical if undocumented workers were removed from the workforce; and this cost would come on top of the cost of litigating and implementing labor laws seeking to remove undocumented immigrants from the workforce.

Source: The Immigration Policy Center report: “The Economics of Immigration Reform: Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants Would Benefit All U.S. Workers and Businesses.

____________________________________

Fact: The costliness of enforcing local immigration laws has already been exemplified by the following case studies.

-ARIZONA: S.B. 1070 led to a boycott of Arizona’s tourism and convention industry that will ultimately cost the state $253 million in economic output and upwards of $86 million in lost wages over the next 2-3 years.

HAZELTON, PENNSYLVANIA: Currently has an immigration control ordinance undergoing litigation.  The litigation has already cost $2.8 million, and it is estimated the cost could exceed $5 million.

RIVERSIDE, NEW JERSEY: The town briefly enacted its own immigration law.  During its brief enactment, Riverside spent $82,000 and lost commercial tax revenues because of business closings.  Riverside reversed the law in hopes of bringing immigrants back to the town to help refuel the economy.

FARMERS BRANCH, TEXAS (a small Dallas suburb): This suburb has already spent $4 million defending its immigration ordinance.  Legal fees are estimated to hit $5 million.

Source: Center for American Progress


_______________________________

About the Sources…

The Perryman Group is an economic and financial analysis firm.  The firm was founded by Dr. M. Ray Perryman, a widely accredited economist.  Although TPG’s founder Dr. Perryman has been acknowledged by the U.S. Congress and the Texas Legislature, he does not openly express any political ties that would have biased this information.

-This particular study was conducted for Americans for Immigration Reform, the Business community’s voice on sensible immigration reform.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

-The IPC is responsible for the American Immigration Council’s research. The American Immigration Council (formerly the American Immigration Law Foundation) was established in 1987 as an IRS designated 501(c)(3),  tax-exempt, not-for-profit educational, charitable organization.

Center for American Progress: The Center for American Progress (CAP) is a self-described “progressive” organization.  It openly admits that it is critical of conservative policymaking. Nonetheless, the Center for American Progress Action Fund is a non-profit, non-partisan organization.

 

 


 

 

Deportation Halted for Some Students as Lawmakers Seek New Policy

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com