Hoosiers React To Supreme Court Ruling On Immigration Law

INDIANAPOLIS — Immigrants living in Indiana reacted positively to the Supreme Court’s ruling on Arizona’s anti-immigration law.

“It was good news. We definitely agree with the court’s decision. We are pleased,” Marlene Dotson, president and CEO of the Indiana Latino Institute, told RTV6’s Jenna Kooi.

The ILI is a nonprofit organization that focuses on health and education issues affecting Latinos in the state.

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Indiana Latino Expo

June 23 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Indiana State Fairgrounds, Marsh Blue Ribbon Pavilion

Event for the Entire Community!

All day long, free of charge and bilingual, activities will be offered in each area.

For example, the Health Fair will offer free health services to the community related with obesity, diabetes, mammograms, health screenings and HIV/AIDS among others. The Indiana State Department of Health is a major contributor/partner in this Expo.

The Education area will provide information on pre-school, elementary, middle and high school opportunities, scholarships, university admissions and continuing education – both academic and technical – for students of all ages.

In the Business area, a job fair, product information booths, seminars, financial education and more will be available.

Government affairs, we will have all the armed forces exhibiting their institutions, vehicles, recruiting opportunities, etc…

Entertainment will be all day long closing with a big concert (4,000 to 5,000 people) with an international artist.

Get more details at www.indianalatinoexpo.org.

Contact:

Indiana Latino Expo Inc.
6002 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, IN 46228
Phone: 317. 254.3240

Blending Of Cultures May Be Blueprint For Growth

“I think people believe that ‘oh, these immigrants are stealing all these jobs,’ ” he said. “We don’t see that here.”

Malenke said there’s a real need for laborers — in dairies, hog confinements, poultry farms and general construction, too.

Not only are immigrants helping buoy the farm economy, but their children are American citizens — they’re part of church communities and schools and sports teams.

“There’s a lot of progress in these communities, I mean in Sioux Center they’re going to build a hospital, a $48 million hospital.  And that’s the kind of things that are happening in these communities, which tells you that businesses are doing well,” he said.

And when communities do well — it gives everybody options. The kids of these immigrant workers – just like other rural kids in the Midwest, are not all going into farm work.  Some want to be doctors, teachers and business owners.  And just like generations before — because of their parents’ hard work, they’ll have that opportunity.

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“I think people believe that ‘oh, these immigrants are stealing all these jobs,’ ” he said. “We don’t see that here.”

Malenke said there’s a real need for laborers — in dairies, hog confinements, poultry farms and general construction, too.

Not only are immigrants helping buoy the farm economy, but their children are American citizens — they’re part of church communities and schools and sports teams.

“There’s a lot of progress in these communities, I mean in Sioux Center they’re going to build a hospital, a $48 million hospital.  And that’s the kind of things that are happening in these communities, which tells you that businesses are doing well,” he said.

And when communities do well — it gives everybody options. The kids of these immigrant workers – just like other rural kids in the Midwest, are not all going into farm work.  Some want to be doctors, teachers and business owners.  And just like generations before — because of their parents’ hard work, they’ll have that opportunity.

[More]

IU kicks off Black History Month activities

The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center also will be the location of IU’s 2012 Black History Month Celebration Kick-Off, from 4 to 6 p.m. Monday.

Other events during the first week of the celebration are a reading by Nikky Finney, winner of the National Book Award; a musical concert; screenings of films in the “Black in Latin America” series; and a “Family Dinner at the NMBCC.”

IU’s African American Choral Ensemble will perform from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the atrium of the IU School of Education, 201 N. Rose Ave.

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Show tunes to Latino culture

Hola Bloomington is a news and public affairs show that features a weekly wrap-up of local news, a guest interview, information about local events and volunteer opportunities and short segments that vary by week. The show broadcasts live from 6 to 7 p.m. every Friday on FM channels 91.3 and 98.1 in Bloomington, 100.7 in Nashville, Ind., and 106.3 in Ellettsville, Ind.

idsnews article

 

Public Wants Immigrants to Be Able to Stay

As the debate over immigration continues to roil the Republican presidential field, a substantial majority of Americans say they would prefer to allow some or all illegal immigrants to remain in the United States, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found.

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When asked what should be done with the roughly 11 million illegal immigrants in the country, just 25 percent of those polled said that they should all be deported “no matter how long they have been in the U.S.”

Beardstown, Small Midwestern Meatpacking Town, Wrestles With Immigration Issue

“It used to be that something happened in Beardstown, and people would blame it on a Mexican,” Walters said. “But, if you look at the numbers, there’s really no difference in the rate of crimes between Hispanics and whites in our city. It’s just not the case.”

Researchers Mark Mather and Kevin Pollard of the Population Reference Bureau, a nonpartisan research organization, say that Latino immigration has helped revive the populations of small townssuch as Beardstown all across the Midwest and Great Plains. Between 2000 and 2006, the researchers found that total population in small towns and rural areas increased only by 3 percent, while Hispanic population grew by 22 percent. Since 1990, the Hispanic population in small towns and rural areas has more than doubled.

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Obama administration asks courts to block parts of tough Alabama immigration law

Please go to cnn.com to read the whole story about the Obama adminstration’s attempts to prevent a “tough new immigration law” from being enacted in Alabama.

According to CNN, these are the story highlighlights:

-The Justice Department asks for an injunction from an appeals court
-The state of Alabama will have to respond in the coming days
-Some parts of the law were already blocked by a federal judge

Immigrants can save your community

The New York Times published an article yesterday dealing with this subject. I’ll post a long excerpt here but I highly recommend that you click through and read the whole thing (then go and read Caught in the Middle). How the Midwest and the Plains states accommodate or resist this immigration will be the defining feature of the next 50 years for these communities. The data is clear though; successful communities are ones that embrace immigrants.

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Beyond 2012 Field, Nuanced G.O.P. Views on Immigrants

This New York Times article discusses the role many Republican freshmen are taking in advocating for the redefinition of “their party’s increasingly anti-immigration image, even as they maintain a strong push for better federal border security.”  Many of these Republicans are pushing for limited immigration measures to be taken (e.g., shortening the green card process).  Overall, this article is a highly relevant, interesting read!

Immigration issues reach Ball State

Issues of immigration aren’t just found in legislatures of the Southwest. They’ve found their way into Indiana politics, and students from Ball State have said they’re disappointed with laws that restrict undocumented students from paying in-state tuition.

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Voices for Justice from the Latino press

Did you know the first printed news in the Americas was published in Mexico, in Spanish, more than a hundred years before Ben Franklin and English-language newspapers? And that the first printing press on the continent was brought to Mexico City in 1535? I didn’t know, until I listened to Felix Gutierrez, a professor of journalism and communication at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School, when he visited the University of Minnesota in September as a guest of the journalism school. He’s an impressive scholar, and the pre-eminent historian of Latino media in the United States.

The beginnings of the Latino press in this country go back more than 200 years to a New Orleans newspaper called El Misisipi…[more]

Census: More Latinos List Themselves as White

The latest census figures also show the number of Americans who identified themselves as partly black and partly white more than doubled to 1.8 million. For the first time, the black-white combination is the most prevalent group among multiracial Americans, making up 1 in 5 members of that subgroup. They exceed the number of multi-racials who identified as being white and “some other race,” composed of mostly Hispanics, as well as white-Asians and white-American Indians.

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La Casa target of racial harassment

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

La Casa director Lillian Casillas tells The Herald-Times a staff member discovered a newspaper with “criminals deport” written next to a picture of a Latino McDonald’s employee. Magnetic letters on a refrigerator had also been arranged to spell, “You need to leave.”

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

ICE-arrest1Of the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States, nearly 40 million are native-born or naturalized citizens of the USA! That translates into the potential of 40 million “legal” citizens of the USA being suspected of being “illegal” immigrants solely on the basis of appearance.

Overcoming a False Sense of Security

Deportation Halted for Some Students as Lawmakers Seek New Policy

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com

The about-face by ICE in Ms. Zanella’s case is an example of the kind of action Democratic lawmakers and Latino and immigrant groups have been demanding from the Obama administration to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, pressure is increasing on President Obama to offer protection from deportation to illegal immigrant college students who might have been eligible for legal status under a bill in Congress known as the Dream Act.

Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Under Review – NYTimes.com

Indiana immigration bill moves on

In a 6 to 5 vote along party lines, the House Public Policy Committee approved Senate Bill 590, which now moves to the full Indiana House for consideration next week. The bill no longer includes a provision that would allow state and local police to question anyone they suspect is in the United States illegally. That section was similar to a law passed in Arizona last summer. The Arizonan measure has been blocked from implementation by a federal judge.

Weakened Indiana immigration bill moves on | WBEZ


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In a 6 to 5 vote along party lines, the House Public Policy Committee approved Senate Bill 590, which now moves to the full Indiana House for consideration next week. The bill no longer includes a provision that would allow state and local police to question anyone they suspect is in the United States illegally. That section was similar to a law passed in Arizona last summer. The Arizonan measure has been blocked from implementation by a federal judge.

Weakened Indiana immigration bill moves on | WBEZ

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Immigration bill faces shift

Gov. Mitch Daniels said Tuesday that he expects a bill cracking down on illegal immigration to be moderated to focus more on employers and less on law enforcement.

Senate Bill 590, as passed by the Senate earlier this session, would have made Indiana the second state in the nation after Arizona to put immigration enforcement in the hands of local law enforcement. But opposition has stiffened, and with Daniels now speaking out against it, the proposal likely is to undergo major surgery in a House committee Thursday.

Immigration bill faces shift | The Indianapolis Star | indystar.com

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Misconceptions about immigrants in the U.S

Myth: Immigrants take jobs away from Americans.
Fact: Nothing could be further from the truth. Studies have shown that quite the opposite is true: Immigrants create jobs. Specifically various recent studies have shown that: Immigrants are more likely to be self-employed and start new businesses. Small businesses, 18 percent of which are started by immigrants, account for up to 80 percent of the new jobs available in the United States each year. Slightly more than 10 percent of the U.S. industrial workforce, or roughly 2.2 million Americans, are employed by foreign companies doing business in the United States. Additionally, the top 105 multinational corporations doing business here have U.S. affiliates that are so large they would qualify for the Fortune 500 list solely on the basis of their stateside operations.

More Myths

Sen. Durbin Is Set To Revive DREAM Act Fight in This Congress

The DREAM Act is coming back. After a bruising, nearly triumphant fight through Congress at the end of last year, Sen. Dick Durbin is preparing to reintroduce the bill this session, his office confirmed last week. The legislation seeks to create a path to citizenship for undocumented youth who grew up in the United States; it surged ahead on the congressional agenda last session as key Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, courted Latino voters in a hard-fought electoral cycle.

Sen. Durbin Is Set To Revive DREAM Act Fight in This Congress – COLORLINES