Why Gifted Latinos Are Often Overlooked And Underserved

Three million school children in the U.S. are identified as gifted. That’s roughly the top 10 percent of the nation’s highest achieving students.

But Rene Islas, head of the National Association for Gifted Children, says tens of thousands of gifted English language learners are never identified. We sat down with Islas and asked him why.

He started out by explaining that there are several different measures for identifying gifted children. The most common in schools is recognizing achievement, above grade level work. But that poses a problem for English language learners, or ELLs, he says.

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Elkhart, Goshen Latino populations are among the largest in Indiana

Elkhart and Goshen have booming Latino populations.

That’s no secret to anyone who’s lived here for even a brief amount of time. You see it in the commercial signage along major streets, in schools, in churches, in supermarkets.

We’re working on a series of stories looking at the growth here and, more particularly, how the Latino population and the broader Elkhart County community have and haven’t adjusted to each other. Meantime, below are some stats I’ve pulled from the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Intersectionality: IU Latina Film Festival and Conference

The third Latino Film Festival and Conference will put Latina filmmakers, actresses, and Latina film scholars at the center. The aim of this festival and conference is to present new perspectives in the studies of Latina identity that move us away from stereotypical representations and that showcases the intersectionality of identity within the contexts of immigration, gender, sexuality, social class, and race/ethnicity issues.

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Cop made racist remarks in St. John

More than 15 people convened outside the department at 11033 W. 93rd Ave. to protest alleged comments made by a St. John police officer. The officer was suspended with pay in December when complaints — documentation of which hasn’t been independently verified — surfaced.

“We are here to denounce a pattern of racial profiling,” said Julie Contreras, immigration chair for the League of United Latin American Citizens.

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Film shows Colombian history

Given Bloomington’s relatively large Colombian community, Israel Herrera said he and other local Colombians are proud to see “Embrace of the Serpent” in their town.

The film, which is the first Colombian film to be nominated for the Academy Awards’ Best Foreign Language Film, screens Friday at the IU Cinema. Following the film’s screening will be a Q&A by actor Brionne Davis, who plays American scientist Richard Evans Schultes.

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First Generation film screening set for April 12 at Indiana Theatre

An exclusive screening of the award-winning film “First Generation,” because going to college and succeeding is possible, will be at 7 p.m. April 12 at the Indiana Theatre, 683 Ohio St., at Ohio and Seventh streets. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

There will be door prizes including five free laptops. The event is sponsored by the Indiana State University Office of Student Success and Vigo County College Success Coalition.

The schedule includes a resource fair before the film from 6:30 to 7 p.m. for people to browse as they arrive. The movie showing is from 7 to 8 p.m., and then a discussion led by ISU trustee Kathy Cabello — herself a first-generation college student — will be from 8 to 8:30 p.m. At the conclusion, refreshments will be available and people can again visit the resource fair.

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New law encourages minorities to pursue school administration

A new measure passed with overwhelming support in the Indiana legislature aims to encourage more minority students to pursue careers in school administration.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed the bill into law the following week. Prior to Harris’ proposed changes, the policy offered stipends up to $5,000 paid directly to certain qualified minority students who were completing the student teaching assignments required for their teaching degrees.

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IUPUI psychologists explore pain in Hispanic Americans

Hispanic Americans report fewer pain conditions compared with non-Hispanic white or black Americans, according to a critical review and analysis of more than 100 studies on pain experience and pain management among Hispanic Americans. The first work of its type was conducted by researchers from the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, led by clinical health psychologist Adam T. Hirsh.

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INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL BREAKS OUT TRUMP FATHEADS TO TAUNT LATINO OPPONENTS

Andrean High School is a Catholic school in northern Indiana whose motto is “Christ Is Our Teacher.” But Jesus has some explaining to do today — how did he let this get through?

In its boys basketball game against Bishop Noll Institute on Friday, the Andrean rooting section went full Donald Trump — holding up fatheads of The Donald, chanting “Build a wall!” and making other racial references. Bishop Noll is primarily Latino.

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Fiesta del Otoño (Fall Cultural Festival) 2015

Fiesta2015Please join us in celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month at the 10th Annual Event Saturday, September 26, 2015 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Bloomington Farmers’ Market. Local Latino artists and community members from many different Latin American and Caribbean countries will showcase their traditions and talents through food, dance, music, activities for the kids, and more. Bring the whole family!

For more information, contact the Latino Programs Office at (812) 349-3860 or latinoprograms@bloomington.in.gov

3 Things You Should Know About Birthright Citizenship

Every few years, the common law concept of jus soli — or birthright citizenship — comes back into the news.

This time, it was thrust onto the stage by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, who just unveiled an immigration plan. One of his proposals is to stop automatically giving citizenship to most people born on U.S. soil. Rival GOP candidate Scott Walker issued a similar call.

The concept of jus soli has a storied history in the United States that dates to the late 1800s.

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Debunking the Myth of the Job-Stealing Immigrant

Most anti-immigration arguments I hear are variations on the Lump of Labor Fallacy. That immigrant has a job. If he didn’t have that job, somebody else, somebody born here, would have it. This argument is wrong, or at least wildly oversimplified. But it feels so correct, so logical. And it’s not just people like my grandfather making that argument. Our government policy is rooted in it.

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NCAA March Madness 2015: 5 Must-See Latino Players to Watch in Tournament

Kentucky Forward Karl Anthony Towns

As the United States of America has shown a larger Latino population than ever before, college basketball has joined the mix. This year’s tournament has numerous Latinos thriving on the court, just waiting to make their mark in the National Basketball Association one day.

Here are five Latinos to keep an eye on in this year’s NCAA Tournament hoops competition:

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Once-retired ambulance heading to Honduras

BEDFORD — The wonders of modern medicine and quick response times during emergencies are a given in developed countries.

But in a country such as Honduras, obstacles are many for people needing medical care.

Capstone Ministries of Mitchell knows well the plight of the Honduran people. Later this month, Allen Burris, Capstone board president, will deliver an ambulance to a hospital in the village of Ojojona, which is a 45-minute trip from the capital of Honduras.

“People are often transported in the backs of pickups when they need to get to the hospital, so this is a tremendous blessing,” said Burris.

The gift of the ambulance was made possible by St. Vincent Dunn Hospital, which donated the out-of-service ambulance to Capstone.

“We talk about our service to the poor, and this is it in action,” said Matt Balla, chief executive officer of St. Vincent Dunn.

On Friday, Balla made the donation to Capstone official, presenting the keys and title to Burris and Capstone board member Warren Crawford.

Crawford visited Honduras on a mission trip in 2010 and knew of the need. He said he noticed the ambulance parked on Mitchell Road and when he found out it was no longer in use by the hospital, Capstone approached St. Vincent Dunn about donating it.

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City to prepare for insurance changes

On any given day, 561,000 Hoosiers are without health insurance, according to the Family and Social Services Administration’s website.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act mandates that all Americans have health insurance. Those who do not purchase some form of insurance will be penalized with a fee.

Beginning Oct. 1, enrollment will begin for Indiana’s health insurance marketplace. The marketplace will serve as a vehicle for uninsured individuals who do not qualify for Medicaid to purchase insurance. Coverage under these new plans begins Jan. 1, 2014.

Indiana has opted for a federally operated insurance exchange program. The details of how exactly this program will work are unclear, Bloomington Health Projects Coordinator Nancy Woolery said.
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Face of Indiana changes

INDIANAPOLIS – Like the rest of the nation, Indiana is continuing on a trend toward greater diversity as the numbers of Hispanics, blacks, Asians and other minorities are rising at a faster pace than whites.

New census data released last week also show the trend may accelerate in the years to come as the most racially and ethnically diverse age-group – Hoosiers under 5 – grow up.

The new census numbers are snapshot estimates of the population in July 2012, and come a year after the U.S. Census Bureau reported the nation is undergoing a historic shift: Fueled by immigration and high rates of birth, particularly among Hispanic Americans, the nation’s racial and ethnic minorities are growing more rapidly in numbers than whites.

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Latino models in short supply in Minn., casting agencies say

MINNEAPOLIS — When Paola Cardenas left Colombia for Minnesota nine years ago and began modeling, she thought the Midwest would be a quick stop before she pursued her ambitions in a place like Los Angeles, an international city that is home many Latin American immigrants.

But that changed after she married and gave birth to her son. Minnesota became home.

“Here people are really sweet,” Cardenas said recently during a photo shoot at Quad Photo in Minneapolis. “I think it’s a more relaxed market, it’s not like that high fashion.”

These days, Cardenas is in demand. Although Minnesota has long been home to the headquarters of big companies and the Twin Cities has a flourishing advertising production industry, modeling and casting companies have hit a hurdle. They say it’s very hard to find Hispanic models. That’s causing them to lose business.

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Hispanic High School Graduates Pass Whites in Rate of College Enrollment

A record seven-in-ten (69%) Hispanic high school graduates in the class of 2012 enrolled in college that fall, two percentage points higher than the rate (67%) among their white counterparts,1 according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.2

This milestone is the result of a long-term increase in Hispanic college-going that accelerated with the onset of the recession in 2008 (Fry and Lopez, 2012). The rate among white high school graduates, by contrast, has declined slightly since 2008.

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Latino Faculty and Staff Council at IU Bloomington presents awards

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Bloomington faculty members, staff and students will be recognized Friday, April 26, for outstanding service to the university’s Latino community.

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The Latino Faculty and Staff Council Latino Awards will be presented in a ceremony at 6 p.m. at Oliver Winery, 8024 N. Ind. 37, Bloomington. The awards recognize individuals or groups that have participated in service and mentoring, promoted diversity initiatives and developed awareness in the areas of culture, arts, health, economy, language or education. [More]