Cultural education comes easily at Goshen High School thanks to diverse student body

“Minority majority school system.”

That is the phrase recently coined by Goshen Community Schools to describe the district.

Latinos make up 51.5 percent of the district’s student body and 47.6 percent ofGoshen High School students. Goshen Community Schools now has the seventh-largest number of Latino students in the state of Indiana, at 3,419, and the highest percentage of Latino students of any Indiana district.

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Longtime Elkhart residents laud diversity, but lament civic disconnect among Hispanics

“I can guarantee 99 percent of them get up and go to work every day because this neighborhood clears out at six in the morning,” Hardy said.

The growth in the Latino population over the past 25 years or so has changed many neighborhoods in Elkhart and Goshen. In the swath of south Elkhart where Hardy lives, an area south of Wolf Avenue between Oakland Avenue and Prairie Street, the surge has been particularly pronounced. From just 110 Latinos in 1990, 1.6 percent of the population, the Hispanic count in the area grew to an estimated 3,036 as of 2014, or 34 percent of the population, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures. That’s higher than the city’s overall Hispanic concentration of 24 percent.

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How My Hispanic Students Feel About Donald Trump

I am told high school kids don’t care much about politics and as a high school history and government teacher I generally must agree. However it has been a difficult stereotype to adhere to recently. With Donald Trump decisively clinching victory in my home state of Indiana I have been asked the same questions, and heard the same concerns again and again. To be clear, I teach at a school with one of the highest populations of Hispanic students in the state of Indiana. I think you can see where this is going.

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Are More Latinos Becoming Citizens Because of Donald Trump?

Donald Trump has energized millions of Republican voters this primary season with his tough talk of building a wall along the Mexico border and deporting people who entered the country illegally.

But, that same language could have an unintentional side effect in a general election and energize legal immigrants to become citizens before November so they can vote against Trump.

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Spanish Program Focuses on ‘Untapped Resource’

Bethel College has launched a business degree it says is the first of its kind in the nation. The Spanish-assisted program mirrors the Mishawaka school’s existing business curriculum and will also boost English speaking and writing skills. Vice President for Adult & Graduate Studies Toni Steffensen Pauls says the program is “taught by people who speak their language, who have made the transition successfully into the professional community.” The pilot group consists of up to 10 students in Elkhart County and Steffensen Pauls hopes it will grow to 100 within a year.

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Latinos Feel Locked Out of GOP as Trump Nears Nomination

Donald Trump’s near lockup of the Republican nomination in Indiana is leaving some GOP Latinos feeling locked out of the GOP with nowhere to turn as others say they are still trying to absorb a Trump candidacy.

Soon after news rolled in that Ted Cruz was suspending his campaign, Houston businessman and GOP stalwart Massey Villarreal swore to NBC News Latino that he not only wouldn’t vote for Trump, “I will not encourage Latinos to vote for him.”

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IU vs Mexico U20 National Soccer Team

IUMEX2016 - 1 (1)Hola Bloomington’s hosts Luis Hernández and Luis Fuentes talk about one of the most anticipated Spring sporting events in Bloomington. The Indiana University’s men’s soccer match versus Mexico’s National U20 team. They provide a summary of the game and interview players and the coach of the Mexican National Team.

[Listen here]

Clinton, Katich -not Cruz- endorsed by nation’s largest Hispanic business group

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during the Indiana Republican Party Spring Dinner Thursday, April 21, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during the Indiana Republican Party Spring Dinner Thursday, April 21, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The nation’s largest Hispanic business group is diving into the presidential campaign for the first time — and is skipping over the only Latino still running.

The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce plans to formally endorse former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, R, for president on Thursday, a shot in the arm for both campaigns at critical moments for each bid.

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Local groups have voter literacy meeting

Three groups came together Saturday to revise a voter-literacy presentation that could mobilize minority populations in Bloomington and Monroe County.

The goal is to bring together members of three under-represented but large voting demographics — women, Hispanic and African-American citizens — to increase voter mobility, City of Bloomington liaison Araceli Gomez said.

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Why Gifted Latinos Are Often Overlooked And Underserved

Three million school children in the U.S. are identified as gifted. That’s roughly the top 10 percent of the nation’s highest achieving students.

But Rene Islas, head of the National Association for Gifted Children, says tens of thousands of gifted English language learners are never identified. We sat down with Islas and asked him why.

He started out by explaining that there are several different measures for identifying gifted children. The most common in schools is recognizing achievement, above grade level work. But that poses a problem for English language learners, or ELLs, he says.

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Elkhart, Goshen Latino populations are among the largest in Indiana

Elkhart and Goshen have booming Latino populations.

That’s no secret to anyone who’s lived here for even a brief amount of time. You see it in the commercial signage along major streets, in schools, in churches, in supermarkets.

We’re working on a series of stories looking at the growth here and, more particularly, how the Latino population and the broader Elkhart County community have and haven’t adjusted to each other. Meantime, below are some stats I’ve pulled from the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Intersectionality: IU Latina Film Festival and Conference

The third Latino Film Festival and Conference will put Latina filmmakers, actresses, and Latina film scholars at the center. The aim of this festival and conference is to present new perspectives in the studies of Latina identity that move us away from stereotypical representations and that showcases the intersectionality of identity within the contexts of immigration, gender, sexuality, social class, and race/ethnicity issues.

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Cop made racist remarks in St. John

More than 15 people convened outside the department at 11033 W. 93rd Ave. to protest alleged comments made by a St. John police officer. The officer was suspended with pay in December when complaints — documentation of which hasn’t been independently verified — surfaced.

“We are here to denounce a pattern of racial profiling,” said Julie Contreras, immigration chair for the League of United Latin American Citizens.

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Film shows Colombian history

Given Bloomington’s relatively large Colombian community, Israel Herrera said he and other local Colombians are proud to see “Embrace of the Serpent” in their town.

The film, which is the first Colombian film to be nominated for the Academy Awards’ Best Foreign Language Film, screens Friday at the IU Cinema. Following the film’s screening will be a Q&A by actor Brionne Davis, who plays American scientist Richard Evans Schultes.

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First Generation film screening set for April 12 at Indiana Theatre

An exclusive screening of the award-winning film “First Generation,” because going to college and succeeding is possible, will be at 7 p.m. April 12 at the Indiana Theatre, 683 Ohio St., at Ohio and Seventh streets. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

There will be door prizes including five free laptops. The event is sponsored by the Indiana State University Office of Student Success and Vigo County College Success Coalition.

The schedule includes a resource fair before the film from 6:30 to 7 p.m. for people to browse as they arrive. The movie showing is from 7 to 8 p.m., and then a discussion led by ISU trustee Kathy Cabello — herself a first-generation college student — will be from 8 to 8:30 p.m. At the conclusion, refreshments will be available and people can again visit the resource fair.

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New law encourages minorities to pursue school administration

A new measure passed with overwhelming support in the Indiana legislature aims to encourage more minority students to pursue careers in school administration.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed the bill into law the following week. Prior to Harris’ proposed changes, the policy offered stipends up to $5,000 paid directly to certain qualified minority students who were completing the student teaching assignments required for their teaching degrees.

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The ‘Obama Effect’ And Latino Identity

Last month, we told you that the Code Switch team is embarking on a big reporting project we’re calling The Obama Effect. The series, coinciding with the final year of Barack Obama’s administration, will explore the ways that his presidency has (or hasn’t) altered how Americans talk and think about race, ethnicity and identity.

Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll be narrowing in on how this story plays out within the Latino community — or communities, rather. How has the idea of Latino identity evolved over the past eight years, in light of America’s first non-white president, the frustrated push for immigration reform and the simple fact that the U.S. is becoming increasingly brown?

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IUPUI psychologists explore pain in Hispanic Americans

Hispanic Americans report fewer pain conditions compared with non-Hispanic white or black Americans, according to a critical review and analysis of more than 100 studies on pain experience and pain management among Hispanic Americans. The first work of its type was conducted by researchers from the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, led by clinical health psychologist Adam T. Hirsh.

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INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL BREAKS OUT TRUMP FATHEADS TO TAUNT LATINO OPPONENTS

Andrean High School is a Catholic school in northern Indiana whose motto is “Christ Is Our Teacher.” But Jesus has some explaining to do today — how did he let this get through?

In its boys basketball game against Bishop Noll Institute on Friday, the Andrean rooting section went full Donald Trump — holding up fatheads of The Donald, chanting “Build a wall!” and making other racial references. Bishop Noll is primarily Latino.

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